A standardized nomenclature zor cervical spine sozt-tissue release and osteotomy zor deformity correction

Christopher P. Ames, Justin S. Smith, Justin K. Scheer, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Virginie Lafage, Vedat Deviren, Bertrand Moal, Themistocles Protopsaltis, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Gregory M. Mundis, Richard Hostin, Eric Otto Klineberg, Douglas C. Burton, Robert Hart, Shay Bess, Frank J. Schwab

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Object. Cervical spine osteotomies are powerful techniques to correct rigid cervical spine deformity. Many variations exist, however, and there is no current standardized system with which to describe and classify cervical osteotomies. This complicates the ability to compare outcomes across procedures and studies. The authors' objective was to establish a universal nomenclature for cervical spine osteotomies to provide a common language among spine surgeons. Methods. A proposed nomenclature with 7 anatomical grades of increasing extent of bone/sozt tissue resection and de-stabilization was designed. The highest grade of resection is termed the major osteotomy, and an approach modifier is used to denote the surgical approach(es), including anterior (A), posterior (P), anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), anterior-posterior-anterior (APA), and posterior-anterior-posterior (PAP). For cases in which multiple grades of osteotomies were performed, the highest grade is termed the major osteotomy, and lower-grade osteotomies are termed minor osteotomies. The nomenclature was evaluated by 11 reviewers through 25 different radiographic clinical cases. The review was performed twice, separated by a minimum 1-week interval. Reliability was assessed using Fleiss kappa coefficients. Results. The average intrarater reliability was classified as "almost perfect agreement" for the major osteotomy (0.89 [range 0.60-1.00]) and approach modifier (0.99 [0.95-1.00]); it was classified as "moderate agreement" for the minor osteotomy (0.73 [range 0.41-1.00]). The average interrater reliability for the 2 readings was the following: major osteotomy, 0.87 ("almost perfect agreement"); approach modifier, 0.99 ("almost perfect agreement"); and minor osteotomy, 0.55 ("moderate agreement"). Analysis of only major osteotomy plus approach modifier yielded a classification that was "almost perfect" with an average intrarater reliability of 0.90 (0.63-1.00) and an interrater reliability of 0.88 and 0.86 for the two reviews. Conclusions. The proposed cervical spine osteotomy nomenclature provides the surgeon with a simple, standard description of the various cervical osteotomies. The reliability analysis demonstrated that this system is consistent and directly applicable. Future work will evaluate the relationship between this system and health-related quality of life metrics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-278
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Spine
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

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Keywords

  • Cervical
  • Deformity
  • Nomenclature
  • Osteotomy
  • Spine
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery
  • Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ames, C. P., Smith, J. S., Scheer, J. K., Shaffrey, C. I., Lafage, V., Deviren, V., ... Schwab, F. J. (2013). A standardized nomenclature zor cervical spine sozt-tissue release and osteotomy zor deformity correction. Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, 19(3), 269-278. https://doi.org/10.3171/2013.5.SPINE121067

A standardized nomenclature zor cervical spine sozt-tissue release and osteotomy zor deformity correction. / Ames, Christopher P.; Smith, Justin S.; Scheer, Justin K.; Shaffrey, Christopher I.; Lafage, Virginie; Deviren, Vedat; Moal, Bertrand; Protopsaltis, Themistocles; Mummaneni, Praveen V.; Mundis, Gregory M.; Hostin, Richard; Klineberg, Eric Otto; Burton, Douglas C.; Hart, Robert; Bess, Shay; Schwab, Frank J.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, Vol. 19, No. 3, 09.2013, p. 269-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ames, CP, Smith, JS, Scheer, JK, Shaffrey, CI, Lafage, V, Deviren, V, Moal, B, Protopsaltis, T, Mummaneni, PV, Mundis, GM, Hostin, R, Klineberg, EO, Burton, DC, Hart, R, Bess, S & Schwab, FJ 2013, 'A standardized nomenclature zor cervical spine sozt-tissue release and osteotomy zor deformity correction', Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 269-278. https://doi.org/10.3171/2013.5.SPINE121067
Ames, Christopher P. ; Smith, Justin S. ; Scheer, Justin K. ; Shaffrey, Christopher I. ; Lafage, Virginie ; Deviren, Vedat ; Moal, Bertrand ; Protopsaltis, Themistocles ; Mummaneni, Praveen V. ; Mundis, Gregory M. ; Hostin, Richard ; Klineberg, Eric Otto ; Burton, Douglas C. ; Hart, Robert ; Bess, Shay ; Schwab, Frank J. / A standardized nomenclature zor cervical spine sozt-tissue release and osteotomy zor deformity correction. In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine. 2013 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 269-278.
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abstract = "Object. Cervical spine osteotomies are powerful techniques to correct rigid cervical spine deformity. Many variations exist, however, and there is no current standardized system with which to describe and classify cervical osteotomies. This complicates the ability to compare outcomes across procedures and studies. The authors' objective was to establish a universal nomenclature for cervical spine osteotomies to provide a common language among spine surgeons. Methods. A proposed nomenclature with 7 anatomical grades of increasing extent of bone/sozt tissue resection and de-stabilization was designed. The highest grade of resection is termed the major osteotomy, and an approach modifier is used to denote the surgical approach(es), including anterior (A), posterior (P), anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), anterior-posterior-anterior (APA), and posterior-anterior-posterior (PAP). For cases in which multiple grades of osteotomies were performed, the highest grade is termed the major osteotomy, and lower-grade osteotomies are termed minor osteotomies. The nomenclature was evaluated by 11 reviewers through 25 different radiographic clinical cases. The review was performed twice, separated by a minimum 1-week interval. Reliability was assessed using Fleiss kappa coefficients. Results. The average intrarater reliability was classified as {"}almost perfect agreement{"} for the major osteotomy (0.89 [range 0.60-1.00]) and approach modifier (0.99 [0.95-1.00]); it was classified as {"}moderate agreement{"} for the minor osteotomy (0.73 [range 0.41-1.00]). The average interrater reliability for the 2 readings was the following: major osteotomy, 0.87 ({"}almost perfect agreement{"}); approach modifier, 0.99 ({"}almost perfect agreement{"}); and minor osteotomy, 0.55 ({"}moderate agreement{"}). Analysis of only major osteotomy plus approach modifier yielded a classification that was {"}almost perfect{"} with an average intrarater reliability of 0.90 (0.63-1.00) and an interrater reliability of 0.88 and 0.86 for the two reviews. Conclusions. The proposed cervical spine osteotomy nomenclature provides the surgeon with a simple, standard description of the various cervical osteotomies. The reliability analysis demonstrated that this system is consistent and directly applicable. Future work will evaluate the relationship between this system and health-related quality of life metrics.",
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T1 - A standardized nomenclature zor cervical spine sozt-tissue release and osteotomy zor deformity correction

AU - Ames, Christopher P.

AU - Smith, Justin S.

AU - Scheer, Justin K.

AU - Shaffrey, Christopher I.

AU - Lafage, Virginie

AU - Deviren, Vedat

AU - Moal, Bertrand

AU - Protopsaltis, Themistocles

AU - Mummaneni, Praveen V.

AU - Mundis, Gregory M.

AU - Hostin, Richard

AU - Klineberg, Eric Otto

AU - Burton, Douglas C.

AU - Hart, Robert

AU - Bess, Shay

AU - Schwab, Frank J.

PY - 2013/9

Y1 - 2013/9

N2 - Object. Cervical spine osteotomies are powerful techniques to correct rigid cervical spine deformity. Many variations exist, however, and there is no current standardized system with which to describe and classify cervical osteotomies. This complicates the ability to compare outcomes across procedures and studies. The authors' objective was to establish a universal nomenclature for cervical spine osteotomies to provide a common language among spine surgeons. Methods. A proposed nomenclature with 7 anatomical grades of increasing extent of bone/sozt tissue resection and de-stabilization was designed. The highest grade of resection is termed the major osteotomy, and an approach modifier is used to denote the surgical approach(es), including anterior (A), posterior (P), anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), anterior-posterior-anterior (APA), and posterior-anterior-posterior (PAP). For cases in which multiple grades of osteotomies were performed, the highest grade is termed the major osteotomy, and lower-grade osteotomies are termed minor osteotomies. The nomenclature was evaluated by 11 reviewers through 25 different radiographic clinical cases. The review was performed twice, separated by a minimum 1-week interval. Reliability was assessed using Fleiss kappa coefficients. Results. The average intrarater reliability was classified as "almost perfect agreement" for the major osteotomy (0.89 [range 0.60-1.00]) and approach modifier (0.99 [0.95-1.00]); it was classified as "moderate agreement" for the minor osteotomy (0.73 [range 0.41-1.00]). The average interrater reliability for the 2 readings was the following: major osteotomy, 0.87 ("almost perfect agreement"); approach modifier, 0.99 ("almost perfect agreement"); and minor osteotomy, 0.55 ("moderate agreement"). Analysis of only major osteotomy plus approach modifier yielded a classification that was "almost perfect" with an average intrarater reliability of 0.90 (0.63-1.00) and an interrater reliability of 0.88 and 0.86 for the two reviews. Conclusions. The proposed cervical spine osteotomy nomenclature provides the surgeon with a simple, standard description of the various cervical osteotomies. The reliability analysis demonstrated that this system is consistent and directly applicable. Future work will evaluate the relationship between this system and health-related quality of life metrics.

AB - Object. Cervical spine osteotomies are powerful techniques to correct rigid cervical spine deformity. Many variations exist, however, and there is no current standardized system with which to describe and classify cervical osteotomies. This complicates the ability to compare outcomes across procedures and studies. The authors' objective was to establish a universal nomenclature for cervical spine osteotomies to provide a common language among spine surgeons. Methods. A proposed nomenclature with 7 anatomical grades of increasing extent of bone/sozt tissue resection and de-stabilization was designed. The highest grade of resection is termed the major osteotomy, and an approach modifier is used to denote the surgical approach(es), including anterior (A), posterior (P), anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), anterior-posterior-anterior (APA), and posterior-anterior-posterior (PAP). For cases in which multiple grades of osteotomies were performed, the highest grade is termed the major osteotomy, and lower-grade osteotomies are termed minor osteotomies. The nomenclature was evaluated by 11 reviewers through 25 different radiographic clinical cases. The review was performed twice, separated by a minimum 1-week interval. Reliability was assessed using Fleiss kappa coefficients. Results. The average intrarater reliability was classified as "almost perfect agreement" for the major osteotomy (0.89 [range 0.60-1.00]) and approach modifier (0.99 [0.95-1.00]); it was classified as "moderate agreement" for the minor osteotomy (0.73 [range 0.41-1.00]). The average interrater reliability for the 2 readings was the following: major osteotomy, 0.87 ("almost perfect agreement"); approach modifier, 0.99 ("almost perfect agreement"); and minor osteotomy, 0.55 ("moderate agreement"). Analysis of only major osteotomy plus approach modifier yielded a classification that was "almost perfect" with an average intrarater reliability of 0.90 (0.63-1.00) and an interrater reliability of 0.88 and 0.86 for the two reviews. Conclusions. The proposed cervical spine osteotomy nomenclature provides the surgeon with a simple, standard description of the various cervical osteotomies. The reliability analysis demonstrated that this system is consistent and directly applicable. Future work will evaluate the relationship between this system and health-related quality of life metrics.

KW - Cervical

KW - Deformity

KW - Nomenclature

KW - Osteotomy

KW - Spine

KW - Surgery

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