A simple three-dimensional in vitro culture mimicking the in vivo-like cell behavior of bladder patient-derived xenograft models

Robson Amaral, Maike Zimmermann, Ai Hong Ma, Hongyong Zhang, Kamilla Swiech, Chong Xian Pan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models allow for personalized drug selection and the identification of drug resistance mechanisms in cancer cells. However, PDX models present technical disadvantages, such as long engraftment time, low success rate, and high maintenance cost. On the other hand, tumor spheroids are emerging as an in vitro alternative model that can maintain the phenotype of cancer cells long enough to perform all assays and predict a patient’s outcome. The present work aimed to describe a simple, reproducible, and low-cost 3D in vitro culture method to generate bladder tumor spheroids using human cells from PDX mice. Cancer cells from PDX BL0293 and BL0808 models, previously established from advanced bladder cancer, were cultured in 96-well round-bottom ultra-low attachment (ULA) plates with 5% Matrigel and generated regular and round-shaped spheroids (roundness > 0.8) with a diameter larger than 400 µm and a hypoxic core (a feature related to drug resistance in solid tumors). The responses of the tumor spheroids to the antineoplastic drugs cisplatin, gemcitabine, and their combination were similar to tumor responses in in vivo studies with PDX BL0293 and BL0808 mice. Therefore, the in vitro 3D model using PDX tumor spheroids appears as a valuable tool that may predict the outcome of in vivo drug-screening assays and represents a low-cost strategy for such purpose.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1304
JournalCancers
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2020

Keywords

  • 3D cell culture
  • Bladder cells
  • Matrigel
  • PDX models
  • Tumor spheroids
  • Ultra-low attachment plates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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