A selective high affinity ligand (SHAL) designed to bind to an over-expressed human antigen on non-Hodgkin's lymphoma also binds to canine B-cell lymphomas

Rod L. Balhorn, Katherine A Skorupski, Saphon Hok, Monique Cosman Balhorn, Teri Guerrero, Robert B Rebhun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Therapies using antibodies directed against cell surface proteins have improved survival for human patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). It is possible that similar immuno-therapeutic approaches may also benefit canine NHL patients. Unfortunately, variability between human and canine epitopes often limits the usefulness of such therapies in pet dogs. The Lym-1 antibody recognizes a unique epitope on HLA-DR10 that is expressed on the majority of human B-cell malignancies. The Lym-1 antibody has now been observed to bind to dog lymphocytes and B-cell NHL. Sequence comparisons and computer modeling of a human and three canine DRB1 proteins identified several orthologs of human HLA-DR10 expressed by dog lymphocytes. Immuno-staining confirmed the presence of proteins containing the Lym-1 epitope on dog lymphocytes and B-cell NHL. In addition, a selective high affinity ligand (SHAL) SH-7139 designed to bind within the Lym-1 epitope of HLA-DR10 was also observed to bind to canine B-cell NHL tissue. This SHAL, which is selectively cytotoxic to cells expressing HLA-DR10 and has been shown to cure mice bearing human B-cell lymphoma xenografts, may prove useful in treating B-cell malignancies in pet dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-242
Number of pages8
JournalVeterinary Immunology and Immunopathology
Volume137
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

Keywords

  • Canine
  • HLA
  • Lym-1
  • Lymphoma
  • Non-Hodgkin's

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • veterinary(all)

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