A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavior therapy for tinnitus

Shannon K. Robinson, Erik S. Viirre, Kelly A. Bailey, Sandra Kindermann, Arpi L. Minassian, Philip R Goldin, Paola Pedrelli, Jeffery P. Harris, John R. McQuaid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study is a randomized, waitlist-controlled trial testing the effect of a brief, "manualized," cognitive-behavioral group therapy on distress associated with tinnitus, quality of well-being, psychological distress including depression, and internal focus. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) included training in activity planning, relaxation training and, primarily, cognitive restructuring. Sixty-five participants were recruited, and 41 completed treatment. Participants were randomly assigned to receive 8 weeks of manualized group CBT either immediately or after an 8-week waiting period. Participants completed outcome measures at the time of their random assignment and at 8, 16, and 52 weeks later. Repeated-measure analysis of covariance revealed significant group-by-time interactions on measures of tinnitus distress and depression, indicating that CBT led to greater improvement in those symptoms. The current results suggest that CBT, applied in a group format using a manual, can reduce the negative emotional distress, including depression, associated with tinnitus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-126
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Tinnitus Journal
Volume14
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2008

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Tinnitus
Cognitive Therapy
Randomized Controlled Trials
Depression
Group Psychotherapy
Teaching
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Psychology

Keywords

  • Cognitive-behavior therapy
  • Tinnitus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Sensory Systems
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Robinson, S. K., Viirre, E. S., Bailey, K. A., Kindermann, S., Minassian, A. L., Goldin, P. R., ... McQuaid, J. R. (2008). A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavior therapy for tinnitus. International Tinnitus Journal, 14(2), 119-126.

A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavior therapy for tinnitus. / Robinson, Shannon K.; Viirre, Erik S.; Bailey, Kelly A.; Kindermann, Sandra; Minassian, Arpi L.; Goldin, Philip R; Pedrelli, Paola; Harris, Jeffery P.; McQuaid, John R.

In: International Tinnitus Journal, Vol. 14, No. 2, 2008, p. 119-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robinson, SK, Viirre, ES, Bailey, KA, Kindermann, S, Minassian, AL, Goldin, PR, Pedrelli, P, Harris, JP & McQuaid, JR 2008, 'A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavior therapy for tinnitus', International Tinnitus Journal, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 119-126.
Robinson SK, Viirre ES, Bailey KA, Kindermann S, Minassian AL, Goldin PR et al. A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavior therapy for tinnitus. International Tinnitus Journal. 2008;14(2):119-126.
Robinson, Shannon K. ; Viirre, Erik S. ; Bailey, Kelly A. ; Kindermann, Sandra ; Minassian, Arpi L. ; Goldin, Philip R ; Pedrelli, Paola ; Harris, Jeffery P. ; McQuaid, John R. / A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavior therapy for tinnitus. In: International Tinnitus Journal. 2008 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 119-126.
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