A randomized, 4-month mango and fat supplementation trial improved vitamin A status among young Gambian children

Bakary S. Drammeh, Grace S. Marquis, Ellen Funkhouser, Chris Bates, Isao Eto, Charles B. Stephensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Supplementation with carotene-rich fruits may be an effective and sustainable approach to prevent vitamin A deficiency. To test the effectiveness of mango supplementation, 176 Gambian children, aged 2 to 7 y, were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: 75 g of dried mango containing ∼150 μg retinol activity equivalents with (MF) or without (M) 5 g of fat, 5 d/wk for 4 mo or 60,000 μg of vitamin A (A) or placebo (P) capsule at baseline. After 4 mo, plasma β-carotene was greater in both the M (P < 0.05) and MF (P < 0.07) groups compared with the P group. After controlling for baseline plasma retinol, elevated acute phase proteins and age, plasma retinol concentrations in the A and MF, but not M, groups were higher than in the P group at the end of the study (P < 0.01). Increases in retinol concentrations, however, were small in both groups. These results support the use of dietary supplementation with dried mangoes and a source of fat as one of several concurrent strategies that can be used to help maintain vitamin A status of children in developing countries where there is a severe seasonal shortage of carotenoid-rich foods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3693-3699
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume132
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

Fingerprint

Mangifera
Vitamin A
mangoes
vitamin A
Fats
Carotenoids
lipids
carotenes
Vitamin A Deficiency
vitamin A deficiency
acute phase proteins
Acute-Phase Proteins
Dietary Supplements
Developing Countries
placebos
Capsules
dietary supplements
developing countries
Fruit
carotenoids

Keywords

  • β-carotene
  • Carotenoids
  • Mango
  • The Gambia
  • Vitamin A deficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Drammeh, B. S., Marquis, G. S., Funkhouser, E., Bates, C., Eto, I., & Stephensen, C. B. (2002). A randomized, 4-month mango and fat supplementation trial improved vitamin A status among young Gambian children. Journal of Nutrition, 132(12), 3693-3699.

A randomized, 4-month mango and fat supplementation trial improved vitamin A status among young Gambian children. / Drammeh, Bakary S.; Marquis, Grace S.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Bates, Chris; Eto, Isao; Stephensen, Charles B.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 132, No. 12, 01.12.2002, p. 3693-3699.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Drammeh, BS, Marquis, GS, Funkhouser, E, Bates, C, Eto, I & Stephensen, CB 2002, 'A randomized, 4-month mango and fat supplementation trial improved vitamin A status among young Gambian children', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 132, no. 12, pp. 3693-3699.
Drammeh BS, Marquis GS, Funkhouser E, Bates C, Eto I, Stephensen CB. A randomized, 4-month mango and fat supplementation trial improved vitamin A status among young Gambian children. Journal of Nutrition. 2002 Dec 1;132(12):3693-3699.
Drammeh, Bakary S. ; Marquis, Grace S. ; Funkhouser, Ellen ; Bates, Chris ; Eto, Isao ; Stephensen, Charles B. / A randomized, 4-month mango and fat supplementation trial improved vitamin A status among young Gambian children. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2002 ; Vol. 132, No. 12. pp. 3693-3699.
@article{afcb2abd9aca4815a9a1d6bfdf122ae7,
title = "A randomized, 4-month mango and fat supplementation trial improved vitamin A status among young Gambian children",
abstract = "Supplementation with carotene-rich fruits may be an effective and sustainable approach to prevent vitamin A deficiency. To test the effectiveness of mango supplementation, 176 Gambian children, aged 2 to 7 y, were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: 75 g of dried mango containing ∼150 μg retinol activity equivalents with (MF) or without (M) 5 g of fat, 5 d/wk for 4 mo or 60,000 μg of vitamin A (A) or placebo (P) capsule at baseline. After 4 mo, plasma β-carotene was greater in both the M (P < 0.05) and MF (P < 0.07) groups compared with the P group. After controlling for baseline plasma retinol, elevated acute phase proteins and age, plasma retinol concentrations in the A and MF, but not M, groups were higher than in the P group at the end of the study (P < 0.01). Increases in retinol concentrations, however, were small in both groups. These results support the use of dietary supplementation with dried mangoes and a source of fat as one of several concurrent strategies that can be used to help maintain vitamin A status of children in developing countries where there is a severe seasonal shortage of carotenoid-rich foods.",
keywords = "β-carotene, Carotenoids, Mango, The Gambia, Vitamin A deficiency",
author = "Drammeh, {Bakary S.} and Marquis, {Grace S.} and Ellen Funkhouser and Chris Bates and Isao Eto and Stephensen, {Charles B.}",
year = "2002",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "132",
pages = "3693--3699",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0022-3166",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A randomized, 4-month mango and fat supplementation trial improved vitamin A status among young Gambian children

AU - Drammeh, Bakary S.

AU - Marquis, Grace S.

AU - Funkhouser, Ellen

AU - Bates, Chris

AU - Eto, Isao

AU - Stephensen, Charles B.

PY - 2002/12/1

Y1 - 2002/12/1

N2 - Supplementation with carotene-rich fruits may be an effective and sustainable approach to prevent vitamin A deficiency. To test the effectiveness of mango supplementation, 176 Gambian children, aged 2 to 7 y, were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: 75 g of dried mango containing ∼150 μg retinol activity equivalents with (MF) or without (M) 5 g of fat, 5 d/wk for 4 mo or 60,000 μg of vitamin A (A) or placebo (P) capsule at baseline. After 4 mo, plasma β-carotene was greater in both the M (P < 0.05) and MF (P < 0.07) groups compared with the P group. After controlling for baseline plasma retinol, elevated acute phase proteins and age, plasma retinol concentrations in the A and MF, but not M, groups were higher than in the P group at the end of the study (P < 0.01). Increases in retinol concentrations, however, were small in both groups. These results support the use of dietary supplementation with dried mangoes and a source of fat as one of several concurrent strategies that can be used to help maintain vitamin A status of children in developing countries where there is a severe seasonal shortage of carotenoid-rich foods.

AB - Supplementation with carotene-rich fruits may be an effective and sustainable approach to prevent vitamin A deficiency. To test the effectiveness of mango supplementation, 176 Gambian children, aged 2 to 7 y, were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: 75 g of dried mango containing ∼150 μg retinol activity equivalents with (MF) or without (M) 5 g of fat, 5 d/wk for 4 mo or 60,000 μg of vitamin A (A) or placebo (P) capsule at baseline. After 4 mo, plasma β-carotene was greater in both the M (P < 0.05) and MF (P < 0.07) groups compared with the P group. After controlling for baseline plasma retinol, elevated acute phase proteins and age, plasma retinol concentrations in the A and MF, but not M, groups were higher than in the P group at the end of the study (P < 0.01). Increases in retinol concentrations, however, were small in both groups. These results support the use of dietary supplementation with dried mangoes and a source of fat as one of several concurrent strategies that can be used to help maintain vitamin A status of children in developing countries where there is a severe seasonal shortage of carotenoid-rich foods.

KW - β-carotene

KW - Carotenoids

KW - Mango

KW - The Gambia

KW - Vitamin A deficiency

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=18744362428&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=18744362428&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12468609

AN - SCOPUS:18744362428

VL - 132

SP - 3693

EP - 3699

JO - Journal of Nutrition

JF - Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0022-3166

IS - 12

ER -