A radio-frequency coupling network for heating of citrate-coated gold nanoparticles for cancer therapy: Design and analysis

Dustin E. Kruse, Douglas N. Stephens, Heather A. Lindfors, Elizabeth S. Ingham, Eric E. Paoli, Katherine W. Ferrara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

68 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are nontoxic, can be functionalized with ligands, and preferentially accumulate in tumors. We have developed a 13.56-MHz RF-electromagnetic field (RF-EM) delivery system capable of generating high E-field strengths required for noninvasive, noncontact heating of GNPs. The bulk heating and specific heating rates were measured as a function of NP size and concentration. It was found that heating is both size and concentration dependent, with 5 nm particles producing a 50.6 0.2 C temperature rise in 30 s for 25g/mL gold (125 W input). The specific heating rate was also size and concentration dependent, with 5 nm particles producing a specific heating rate of 356 78kW/g gold at 16g/mL (125 W input). Furthermore, we demonstrate that cancer cells incubated with GNPs are killed when exposed to 13.56 MHz RF-EM fields. Compared to cells that were not incubated with GNPs, three out of four RF-treated groups showed a significant enhancement of cell death with GNPs (p < 0.05). GNP-enhanced cell killing appears to require temperatures above 50 C for the experimental parameters used in this study. Transmission electron micrographs show extensive vacuolization with the combination of GNPs and RF treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5727917
Pages (from-to)2002-2012
Number of pages11
JournalIEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering
Volume58
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

Keywords

  • Cancer therapy
  • gold nanoparticles (GNPs)
  • nanotechnology
  • resonant circuits
  • RF hyperthermia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

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