A practical approach to the diagnosis of growth hormone (GH) deficiency in patients transitioning to adulthood using GH stimulation testing

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To establish the diagnosis of adult growth hormone deficiency (GHD), GH-deficient children transitioning to adulthood are evaluated by two separate stimuli 2 or more weeks after ceasing GH therapy. While 20-88% of children diagnosed with idiopathic GHD retest with normal values, those with proven genetic defects in GH production/secretion/bioactivity and patients with panhypopituitarism consistently test deficient. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defines GHD in adults by stimulated peak serum GH concentrations <5 ng/ml if measured by polyclonal radioimmunoassays (RIA) or lower if measured by monoclonal assays. Some investigators define severe GHD by a peak GH concentration <3 ng/ml. Adult responses to arginine and glucagon testing are similar to the responses to insulin tolerance testing; clonidine, pyridostigmine, and galanin cause lesser peaks of GH. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) combined with arginine, GH releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6), or hexarelin leads to higher peak responses than GHRH alone. Thus the choice of testing methods impacts the diagnosis of GHD in transition patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)637-643
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume16
Issue numberSUPPL. 3
StatePublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Growth Hormone
Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone
Arginine
Pyridostigmine Bromide
Galanin
Patient Transfer
Clonidine
United States Food and Drug Administration
Glucagon
Radioimmunoassay
Reference Values
Research Personnel
Insulin

Keywords

  • Arginine
  • Clonidine
  • Galanin
  • Glucagon
  • Hexarelin
  • Insulin
  • Pyridostigmine
  • Somatropin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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title = "A practical approach to the diagnosis of growth hormone (GH) deficiency in patients transitioning to adulthood using GH stimulation testing",
abstract = "To establish the diagnosis of adult growth hormone deficiency (GHD), GH-deficient children transitioning to adulthood are evaluated by two separate stimuli 2 or more weeks after ceasing GH therapy. While 20-88{\%} of children diagnosed with idiopathic GHD retest with normal values, those with proven genetic defects in GH production/secretion/bioactivity and patients with panhypopituitarism consistently test deficient. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defines GHD in adults by stimulated peak serum GH concentrations <5 ng/ml if measured by polyclonal radioimmunoassays (RIA) or lower if measured by monoclonal assays. Some investigators define severe GHD by a peak GH concentration <3 ng/ml. Adult responses to arginine and glucagon testing are similar to the responses to insulin tolerance testing; clonidine, pyridostigmine, and galanin cause lesser peaks of GH. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) combined with arginine, GH releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6), or hexarelin leads to higher peak responses than GHRH alone. Thus the choice of testing methods impacts the diagnosis of GHD in transition patients.",
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AU - Styne, Dennis M

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N2 - To establish the diagnosis of adult growth hormone deficiency (GHD), GH-deficient children transitioning to adulthood are evaluated by two separate stimuli 2 or more weeks after ceasing GH therapy. While 20-88% of children diagnosed with idiopathic GHD retest with normal values, those with proven genetic defects in GH production/secretion/bioactivity and patients with panhypopituitarism consistently test deficient. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defines GHD in adults by stimulated peak serum GH concentrations <5 ng/ml if measured by polyclonal radioimmunoassays (RIA) or lower if measured by monoclonal assays. Some investigators define severe GHD by a peak GH concentration <3 ng/ml. Adult responses to arginine and glucagon testing are similar to the responses to insulin tolerance testing; clonidine, pyridostigmine, and galanin cause lesser peaks of GH. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) combined with arginine, GH releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6), or hexarelin leads to higher peak responses than GHRH alone. Thus the choice of testing methods impacts the diagnosis of GHD in transition patients.

AB - To establish the diagnosis of adult growth hormone deficiency (GHD), GH-deficient children transitioning to adulthood are evaluated by two separate stimuli 2 or more weeks after ceasing GH therapy. While 20-88% of children diagnosed with idiopathic GHD retest with normal values, those with proven genetic defects in GH production/secretion/bioactivity and patients with panhypopituitarism consistently test deficient. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defines GHD in adults by stimulated peak serum GH concentrations <5 ng/ml if measured by polyclonal radioimmunoassays (RIA) or lower if measured by monoclonal assays. Some investigators define severe GHD by a peak GH concentration <3 ng/ml. Adult responses to arginine and glucagon testing are similar to the responses to insulin tolerance testing; clonidine, pyridostigmine, and galanin cause lesser peaks of GH. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) combined with arginine, GH releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6), or hexarelin leads to higher peak responses than GHRH alone. Thus the choice of testing methods impacts the diagnosis of GHD in transition patients.

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KW - Clonidine

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KW - Somatropin

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