A population-based analysis of the clinical course of 10,304 patients with acute cholecystitis, discharged without cholecystectomy

Charles De Mestral, Ori D. Rotstein, Andreas Laupacis, Jeffrey S Hoch, Brandon Zagorski, Avery B. Nathens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Randomized trials and expert opinion support early laparoscopic cholecystectomy for most patients with acute cholecystitis (AC); however, practice patterns remain variable worldwide, and delayed cholecystectomy remains a common practice. We therefore present a population-based analysis of the clinical course of patients with AC discharged without cholecystectomy. METHODS: Using administrative databases capturing all emergency department (ED) visits and hospital admissions within a geographic region encompassing 13 million persons, we identified adults with a first emergency admission for uncomplicated AC during the period of 2004 to 2011. In those discharged without cholecystectomy, the probability of a subsequent gallstone-related event (gallstone-related ED visit or hospital admission) was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier methods. The association of patient characteristics with time to first gallstone-related event after discharge was explored through multivariable time to event analysis. RESULTS: Of 25,397 patients with AC, 10,304 (41%) did not undergo cholecystectomy on first admission. The probability of a gallstone-related event by 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 1 year after discharge was 14%, 19%, and 29% respectively. Of these events, 30% were for biliary tract obstruction or pancreatitis. When controlling for sex, income, and comorbidity level, the risk of a gallstone-related event was highest for patients 18 years to 34 years old. CONCLUSION: For patients who do not undergo cholecystectomy on first admission for AC, the probability of a gallstone-related ED visit or hospital admission within 12 weeks of discharge is 19%. The increased risk in younger patients reinforces the value of early cholecystectomy in the nonelderly. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic study, level III; therapeutic study, level IV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-31
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Volume74
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acute Cholecystitis
Cholecystectomy
Gallstones
Population
Hospital Emergency Service
Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
Expert Testimony
Biliary Tract
Pancreatitis
Comorbidity
Emergencies
Databases

Keywords

  • Acute cholecystitis
  • delayed cholecystectomy
  • recurrent gallstone symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

A population-based analysis of the clinical course of 10,304 patients with acute cholecystitis, discharged without cholecystectomy. / De Mestral, Charles; Rotstein, Ori D.; Laupacis, Andreas; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Zagorski, Brandon; Nathens, Avery B.

In: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Vol. 74, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 26-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Mestral, Charles ; Rotstein, Ori D. ; Laupacis, Andreas ; Hoch, Jeffrey S ; Zagorski, Brandon ; Nathens, Avery B. / A population-based analysis of the clinical course of 10,304 patients with acute cholecystitis, discharged without cholecystectomy. In: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery. 2013 ; Vol. 74, No. 1. pp. 26-31.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Randomized trials and expert opinion support early laparoscopic cholecystectomy for most patients with acute cholecystitis (AC); however, practice patterns remain variable worldwide, and delayed cholecystectomy remains a common practice. We therefore present a population-based analysis of the clinical course of patients with AC discharged without cholecystectomy. METHODS: Using administrative databases capturing all emergency department (ED) visits and hospital admissions within a geographic region encompassing 13 million persons, we identified adults with a first emergency admission for uncomplicated AC during the period of 2004 to 2011. In those discharged without cholecystectomy, the probability of a subsequent gallstone-related event (gallstone-related ED visit or hospital admission) was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier methods. The association of patient characteristics with time to first gallstone-related event after discharge was explored through multivariable time to event analysis. RESULTS: Of 25,397 patients with AC, 10,304 (41{\%}) did not undergo cholecystectomy on first admission. The probability of a gallstone-related event by 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 1 year after discharge was 14{\%}, 19{\%}, and 29{\%} respectively. Of these events, 30{\%} were for biliary tract obstruction or pancreatitis. When controlling for sex, income, and comorbidity level, the risk of a gallstone-related event was highest for patients 18 years to 34 years old. CONCLUSION: For patients who do not undergo cholecystectomy on first admission for AC, the probability of a gallstone-related ED visit or hospital admission within 12 weeks of discharge is 19{\%}. The increased risk in younger patients reinforces the value of early cholecystectomy in the nonelderly. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic study, level III; therapeutic study, level IV.",
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AU - Hoch, Jeffrey S

AU - Zagorski, Brandon

AU - Nathens, Avery B.

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Randomized trials and expert opinion support early laparoscopic cholecystectomy for most patients with acute cholecystitis (AC); however, practice patterns remain variable worldwide, and delayed cholecystectomy remains a common practice. We therefore present a population-based analysis of the clinical course of patients with AC discharged without cholecystectomy. METHODS: Using administrative databases capturing all emergency department (ED) visits and hospital admissions within a geographic region encompassing 13 million persons, we identified adults with a first emergency admission for uncomplicated AC during the period of 2004 to 2011. In those discharged without cholecystectomy, the probability of a subsequent gallstone-related event (gallstone-related ED visit or hospital admission) was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier methods. The association of patient characteristics with time to first gallstone-related event after discharge was explored through multivariable time to event analysis. RESULTS: Of 25,397 patients with AC, 10,304 (41%) did not undergo cholecystectomy on first admission. The probability of a gallstone-related event by 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 1 year after discharge was 14%, 19%, and 29% respectively. Of these events, 30% were for biliary tract obstruction or pancreatitis. When controlling for sex, income, and comorbidity level, the risk of a gallstone-related event was highest for patients 18 years to 34 years old. CONCLUSION: For patients who do not undergo cholecystectomy on first admission for AC, the probability of a gallstone-related ED visit or hospital admission within 12 weeks of discharge is 19%. The increased risk in younger patients reinforces the value of early cholecystectomy in the nonelderly. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic study, level III; therapeutic study, level IV.

AB - BACKGROUND: Randomized trials and expert opinion support early laparoscopic cholecystectomy for most patients with acute cholecystitis (AC); however, practice patterns remain variable worldwide, and delayed cholecystectomy remains a common practice. We therefore present a population-based analysis of the clinical course of patients with AC discharged without cholecystectomy. METHODS: Using administrative databases capturing all emergency department (ED) visits and hospital admissions within a geographic region encompassing 13 million persons, we identified adults with a first emergency admission for uncomplicated AC during the period of 2004 to 2011. In those discharged without cholecystectomy, the probability of a subsequent gallstone-related event (gallstone-related ED visit or hospital admission) was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier methods. The association of patient characteristics with time to first gallstone-related event after discharge was explored through multivariable time to event analysis. RESULTS: Of 25,397 patients with AC, 10,304 (41%) did not undergo cholecystectomy on first admission. The probability of a gallstone-related event by 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 1 year after discharge was 14%, 19%, and 29% respectively. Of these events, 30% were for biliary tract obstruction or pancreatitis. When controlling for sex, income, and comorbidity level, the risk of a gallstone-related event was highest for patients 18 years to 34 years old. CONCLUSION: For patients who do not undergo cholecystectomy on first admission for AC, the probability of a gallstone-related ED visit or hospital admission within 12 weeks of discharge is 19%. The increased risk in younger patients reinforces the value of early cholecystectomy in the nonelderly. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic study, level III; therapeutic study, level IV.

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KW - delayed cholecystectomy

KW - recurrent gallstone symptoms

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