A novel in vivo gene transfer technique and in vitro cell based assays for the study of bone loss in musculoskeletal disorders

Dennis J. Wu, Neha Dixit, Erika Suzuki, Thanh Nguyen, Hyun Seock Shin, Jack Davis, Emanual Michael Maverakis, Iannis Adamopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Differentiation and activation of osteoclasts play a key role in the development of musculoskeletal diseases as these cells are primarily involved in bone resorption. Osteoclasts can be generated in vitro from monocyte/macrophage precursor cells in the presence of certain cytokines, which promote survival and differentiation. Here, both in vivo and in vitro techniques are demonstrated, which allow scientists to study different cytokine contributions towards osteoclast differentiation, signaling, and activation. The minicircle DNA delivery gene transfer system provides an alternative method to establish an osteoporosis-related model is particularly useful to study the efficacy of various pharmacological inhibitors in vivo. Similarly, in vitro culturing protocols for producing osteoclasts from human precursor cells in the presence of specific cytokines enables scientists to study osteoclastogenesis in human cells for translational applications. Combined, these techniques have the potential to accelerate drug discovery efforts for osteoclast-specific targeted therapeutics, which may benefit millions of osteoporosis and arthritis patients worldwide.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere51810
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Issue number88
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 8 2014

Fingerprint

Gene transfer
Gene Transfer Techniques
Osteoclasts
Assays
Bone
Bone and Bones
Cytokines
Osteoporosis
Monocyte-Macrophage Precursor Cells
Chemical activation
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Macrophages
Drug Discovery
Bone Resorption
Osteogenesis
Arthritis
DNA
Cells
In Vitro Techniques
Pharmacology

Keywords

  • Arthritis
  • Cell culture
  • Hydrodynamic delivery
  • Issue 88
  • Macrophages
  • Medicine
  • Minicircle DNA
  • Osteoclast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

A novel in vivo gene transfer technique and in vitro cell based assays for the study of bone loss in musculoskeletal disorders. / Wu, Dennis J.; Dixit, Neha; Suzuki, Erika; Nguyen, Thanh; Shin, Hyun Seock; Davis, Jack; Maverakis, Emanual Michael; Adamopoulos, Iannis.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, No. 88, e51810, 08.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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