A novel CYP27B1 mutation causes a feline vitamin D-dependent rickets type IA

Robert A Grahn, Melanie r. Ellis, Jennifer c. Grahn, Leslie A Lyons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 12-week-old domestic cat presented at a local veterinary clinic with hypocalcemia and skeletal abnormalities suggestive of rickets. Osteomalacia (rickets) is a disease caused by impaired bone mineralization leading to an increased prevalence of fractures and deformity. Described in a variety of species, rickets is most commonly caused by vitamin D or calcium deficiencies owing to both environmental and or genetic abnormalities. Vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1A (VDDR-1A) is a result of the enzymatic pathway defect caused by mutations in the 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1-alpha-hydroxylase gene [cytochrome P27 B1 (CYP27B1)]. Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D3, regulates calcium homeostasis, which requires sufficient dietary calcium availability and correct hormonal function for proper bone growth and maintenance. Patient calcitriol concentrations were low while calcidiol levels were normal suggestive of VDDR-1A. The entire DNA coding sequencing of CYP27B1 was evaluated. The affected cat was wild type for previously identified VDDR-1A causative mutations. However, six novel mutations were identified, one of which was a nonsense mutation at G637T in exon 4. The exon 4 G637T nonsense mutation results in a premature protein truncation, changing a glutamic acid to a stop codon, E213X, likely causing the clinical presentation of rickets. The previously documented genetic mutation resulting in feline VDDR-1A rickets, as well as the case presented in this research, result from novel exon 4 CYP27B1 mutations, thus exon 4 should be the initial focus of future sequencing efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)587-590
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

rickets
Rickets
Felidae
cytochromes
vitamin D
Vitamin D
cats
Exons
mutation
Mutation
Calcitriol
Nonsense Codon
exons
Cats
25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-Hydroxylase
nonsense mutation
25-hydroxycholecalciferol
calcitriol
Calcium
Animal Hospitals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Small Animals

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A novel CYP27B1 mutation causes a feline vitamin D-dependent rickets type IA. / Grahn, Robert A; Ellis, Melanie r.; Grahn, Jennifer c.; Lyons, Leslie A.

In: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 14, No. 8, 2012, p. 587-590.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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