A national study of obesity prevalence and trends by type of rural county

J. Elizabeth Jackson, Mark P. Doescher, Anthony F Jerant, L. Gary Hart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

170 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Obesity is epidemic in the United States, but information on this trend by type of rural locale is limited. Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of and recent trends in obesity among US adults residing in rural locations. Methods: Analysis of data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for the years 1994-1996 (n = 342,055) and 2000-2001 (n = 385,384). The main outcome measure was obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥30), as determined by calculating BMI from respondents' self-reported height and weight. Results: In 2000-2001, the prevalence of obesity was 23.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 22.6%-23.4%) for rural adults and 20.5% (95% CI 20.2%-20.7%) for their urban counterparts, representing increases of 4.8% (95% CI 4.2%-5.3%) and 5.5% (95% CI 5.1%-5.9%), respectively, since 1994-1996. The highest obesity prevalence occurred in rural counties in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas; obesity prevalence increased for rural residents in all states but Florida over the study period. African Americans had the highest obesity prevalence of any group, up to 31.4% (95% CI 29.1%-33.6) in rural counties adjacent to urban counties. The largest difference in obesity prevalence between those with a college education compared with those without a high school diploma occurred in urban areas (18.4% [95% CI 17.9%-18.9%] vs 23.5% [95% CI 22.5%-24.5%], respectively); the smallest difference occurred in small, remote rural counties (20.3% [95% CI 18.7%-21.9%] versus 22.3% [95% CI 20.7%-24.0%], respectively). Conclusions: The prevalence of obesity is higher in rural counties than in urban counties; obesity affects some residents of rural counties disproportionately.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-148
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Rural Health
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
confidence
Confidence Intervals
trend
Body Mass Index
resident
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Mississippi
surveillance
African Americans
urban area
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education
Weights and Measures
school
education
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

A national study of obesity prevalence and trends by type of rural county. / Jackson, J. Elizabeth; Doescher, Mark P.; Jerant, Anthony F; Hart, L. Gary.

In: Journal of Rural Health, Vol. 21, No. 2, 03.2005, p. 140-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jackson, J. Elizabeth ; Doescher, Mark P. ; Jerant, Anthony F ; Hart, L. Gary. / A national study of obesity prevalence and trends by type of rural county. In: Journal of Rural Health. 2005 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 140-148.
@article{798213b7b36249ec807f087cabb81f23,
title = "A national study of obesity prevalence and trends by type of rural county",
abstract = "Context: Obesity is epidemic in the United States, but information on this trend by type of rural locale is limited. Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of and recent trends in obesity among US adults residing in rural locations. Methods: Analysis of data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for the years 1994-1996 (n = 342,055) and 2000-2001 (n = 385,384). The main outcome measure was obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥30), as determined by calculating BMI from respondents' self-reported height and weight. Results: In 2000-2001, the prevalence of obesity was 23.0{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 22.6{\%}-23.4{\%}) for rural adults and 20.5{\%} (95{\%} CI 20.2{\%}-20.7{\%}) for their urban counterparts, representing increases of 4.8{\%} (95{\%} CI 4.2{\%}-5.3{\%}) and 5.5{\%} (95{\%} CI 5.1{\%}-5.9{\%}), respectively, since 1994-1996. The highest obesity prevalence occurred in rural counties in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas; obesity prevalence increased for rural residents in all states but Florida over the study period. African Americans had the highest obesity prevalence of any group, up to 31.4{\%} (95{\%} CI 29.1{\%}-33.6) in rural counties adjacent to urban counties. The largest difference in obesity prevalence between those with a college education compared with those without a high school diploma occurred in urban areas (18.4{\%} [95{\%} CI 17.9{\%}-18.9{\%}] vs 23.5{\%} [95{\%} CI 22.5{\%}-24.5{\%}], respectively); the smallest difference occurred in small, remote rural counties (20.3{\%} [95{\%} CI 18.7{\%}-21.9{\%}] versus 22.3{\%} [95{\%} CI 20.7{\%}-24.0{\%}], respectively). Conclusions: The prevalence of obesity is higher in rural counties than in urban counties; obesity affects some residents of rural counties disproportionately.",
author = "Jackson, {J. Elizabeth} and Doescher, {Mark P.} and Jerant, {Anthony F} and Hart, {L. Gary}",
year = "2005",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1111/j.1748-0361.2005.tb00074.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "140--148",
journal = "Journal of Rural Health",
issn = "0890-765X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A national study of obesity prevalence and trends by type of rural county

AU - Jackson, J. Elizabeth

AU - Doescher, Mark P.

AU - Jerant, Anthony F

AU - Hart, L. Gary

PY - 2005/3

Y1 - 2005/3

N2 - Context: Obesity is epidemic in the United States, but information on this trend by type of rural locale is limited. Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of and recent trends in obesity among US adults residing in rural locations. Methods: Analysis of data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for the years 1994-1996 (n = 342,055) and 2000-2001 (n = 385,384). The main outcome measure was obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥30), as determined by calculating BMI from respondents' self-reported height and weight. Results: In 2000-2001, the prevalence of obesity was 23.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 22.6%-23.4%) for rural adults and 20.5% (95% CI 20.2%-20.7%) for their urban counterparts, representing increases of 4.8% (95% CI 4.2%-5.3%) and 5.5% (95% CI 5.1%-5.9%), respectively, since 1994-1996. The highest obesity prevalence occurred in rural counties in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas; obesity prevalence increased for rural residents in all states but Florida over the study period. African Americans had the highest obesity prevalence of any group, up to 31.4% (95% CI 29.1%-33.6) in rural counties adjacent to urban counties. The largest difference in obesity prevalence between those with a college education compared with those without a high school diploma occurred in urban areas (18.4% [95% CI 17.9%-18.9%] vs 23.5% [95% CI 22.5%-24.5%], respectively); the smallest difference occurred in small, remote rural counties (20.3% [95% CI 18.7%-21.9%] versus 22.3% [95% CI 20.7%-24.0%], respectively). Conclusions: The prevalence of obesity is higher in rural counties than in urban counties; obesity affects some residents of rural counties disproportionately.

AB - Context: Obesity is epidemic in the United States, but information on this trend by type of rural locale is limited. Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of and recent trends in obesity among US adults residing in rural locations. Methods: Analysis of data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for the years 1994-1996 (n = 342,055) and 2000-2001 (n = 385,384). The main outcome measure was obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥30), as determined by calculating BMI from respondents' self-reported height and weight. Results: In 2000-2001, the prevalence of obesity was 23.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 22.6%-23.4%) for rural adults and 20.5% (95% CI 20.2%-20.7%) for their urban counterparts, representing increases of 4.8% (95% CI 4.2%-5.3%) and 5.5% (95% CI 5.1%-5.9%), respectively, since 1994-1996. The highest obesity prevalence occurred in rural counties in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas; obesity prevalence increased for rural residents in all states but Florida over the study period. African Americans had the highest obesity prevalence of any group, up to 31.4% (95% CI 29.1%-33.6) in rural counties adjacent to urban counties. The largest difference in obesity prevalence between those with a college education compared with those without a high school diploma occurred in urban areas (18.4% [95% CI 17.9%-18.9%] vs 23.5% [95% CI 22.5%-24.5%], respectively); the smallest difference occurred in small, remote rural counties (20.3% [95% CI 18.7%-21.9%] versus 22.3% [95% CI 20.7%-24.0%], respectively). Conclusions: The prevalence of obesity is higher in rural counties than in urban counties; obesity affects some residents of rural counties disproportionately.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=16244383489&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=16244383489&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1748-0361.2005.tb00074.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1748-0361.2005.tb00074.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 15859051

AN - SCOPUS:16244383489

VL - 21

SP - 140

EP - 148

JO - Journal of Rural Health

JF - Journal of Rural Health

SN - 0890-765X

IS - 2

ER -