A multinutrient-fortified beverage enhances the nutritional status of children in Botswana

Steven A. Abrams, Alex Mushi, David C. Hilmers, Ian J. Griffin, Penni Davila, Lindsay Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Due to their widespread acceptability, multinutrient-fortified foods and beverages may be useful in reducing micronutrient deficiencies, especially in developing countries. We studied the efficacy of a new fortified beverage in improving the nutritional status of children in Botswana. We screened 311 lower income urban school children, ages 6-11 y, in two primary schools near Gaborone. Children were given seven 240-mL servings weekly of either an experimental beverage (EXP) fortified with 12 micronutrients or an isoenergetic placebo drink (CON) for 8 wk. Weight, mid-upper arm circumference, hemoglobin, retinol, ferritin, vitamin B-12, folate and riboflavin status were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. Plasma zinc and serum transferrin receptors also were measured at study end. A total of 145 children in the EXP group and 118 in the CON group completed the trial. Using multivariate analysis, the changes in mid-upper arm circumference, weight for age and total weight were significantly better in the EXP group than in the CON group (P < 0.01). Ferritin, riboflavin and folate status were significantly better in the EXP group than in the CON group at study end (P < 0.01), but serum vitamin B-12 was not. Zinc was significantly higher and transferrin receptors were significantly lower at the conclusion of the study in the EXP group than in the CON group (P < 0.001). Mean plasma retinol concentrations, which were low (<0.7 μmol/L) in both groups, did not change. We conclude that a micronutrient-fortified beverage may be beneficial as part of a comprehensive nutritional supplementation program in populations at risk for micronutrient deficiencies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1834-1840
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume133
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Botswana
Beverages
Nutritional Status
beverages
nutritional status
Micronutrients
dietary minerals
Transferrin Receptors
Riboflavin
arm circumference
Vitamin B 12
Ferritins
Vitamin A
Folic Acid
Weights and Measures
ferritin
transferrin
vitamin B12
riboflavin
Zinc

Keywords

  • Africa
  • Fortified beverage
  • Micronutrient deficiency
  • Undernutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Abrams, S. A., Mushi, A., Hilmers, D. C., Griffin, I. J., Davila, P., & Allen, L. (2003). A multinutrient-fortified beverage enhances the nutritional status of children in Botswana. Journal of Nutrition, 133(6), 1834-1840.

A multinutrient-fortified beverage enhances the nutritional status of children in Botswana. / Abrams, Steven A.; Mushi, Alex; Hilmers, David C.; Griffin, Ian J.; Davila, Penni; Allen, Lindsay.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 133, No. 6, 01.06.2003, p. 1834-1840.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abrams, SA, Mushi, A, Hilmers, DC, Griffin, IJ, Davila, P & Allen, L 2003, 'A multinutrient-fortified beverage enhances the nutritional status of children in Botswana', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 133, no. 6, pp. 1834-1840.
Abrams SA, Mushi A, Hilmers DC, Griffin IJ, Davila P, Allen L. A multinutrient-fortified beverage enhances the nutritional status of children in Botswana. Journal of Nutrition. 2003 Jun 1;133(6):1834-1840.
Abrams, Steven A. ; Mushi, Alex ; Hilmers, David C. ; Griffin, Ian J. ; Davila, Penni ; Allen, Lindsay. / A multinutrient-fortified beverage enhances the nutritional status of children in Botswana. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2003 ; Vol. 133, No. 6. pp. 1834-1840.
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