A multi-institution analysis of general surgery resident peer-reviewed publication trends

Joseph D. Forrester, Parswa Ansari, Chandrakanth Are, Edward Auyang, Joseph M Galante, Benjamin T. Jarman, Brian R. Smith, Anthony C. Watkins, Marc L. Melcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The process of taking a research project from conception to publication is one way to encourage surgeons to communicate hypothesis, critically assess literature and data, and defend research conclusions to a broad audience. The goal of this study was to define surgery resident publishing epidemiology and identify characteristics of residents and residency programs that might predict increased publication productivity. Materials and methods A survey was administered to eight general surgery residency programs to collect residency and resident variables from 1993-2013. The primary endpoint was the number of first-author publications produced per resident. Secondary endpoints included clinical setting at which the former resident was practicing, fellowship pursued, and manuscript quality. Results Between 1993 and 2013, 676 residents graduated, median age was 33 years (range: 29-43 years) and 182 (27%) were female. Three hundred and sixty-six (54%) residents produced 1229 first-author publications. Of these, 112 (31%) residents produced one manuscript, 125 (34%) produced two-three manuscripts, 107 (29%) produced four-nine manuscripts, and 22 (6%) produced 10 or more manuscripts. Publishing ≥1 manuscript in residency was associated with a 1.5 (P = 0.01) increased odds of having attended a top-tier research institution for medical school and a 2.3 (P < 0.001) increased odds of having dedicated research years incorporated into residency. Surgeons practicing at academic centers had 1.7 (P = 0.003) greater odds of having attended top-tier medical schools, and 1.5 (P = 0.02) greater odds of publishing during residency. Conclusions Additional research directed at identifying interventions promoting resident publishing and scholastic achievement should benefit all surgery training programs looking to cultivate the next generation of critically thinking surgeons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-98
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume210
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

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Keywords

  • Academic surgeon
  • Authorship
  • Research
  • Surgery residents
  • Writing program

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

A multi-institution analysis of general surgery resident peer-reviewed publication trends. / Forrester, Joseph D.; Ansari, Parswa; Are, Chandrakanth; Auyang, Edward; Galante, Joseph M; Jarman, Benjamin T.; Smith, Brian R.; Watkins, Anthony C.; Melcher, Marc L.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 210, 01.04.2017, p. 92-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Forrester, JD, Ansari, P, Are, C, Auyang, E, Galante, JM, Jarman, BT, Smith, BR, Watkins, AC & Melcher, ML 2017, 'A multi-institution analysis of general surgery resident peer-reviewed publication trends', Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 210, pp. 92-98. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2016.11.015
Forrester, Joseph D. ; Ansari, Parswa ; Are, Chandrakanth ; Auyang, Edward ; Galante, Joseph M ; Jarman, Benjamin T. ; Smith, Brian R. ; Watkins, Anthony C. ; Melcher, Marc L. / A multi-institution analysis of general surgery resident peer-reviewed publication trends. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2017 ; Vol. 210. pp. 92-98.
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abstract = "Background The process of taking a research project from conception to publication is one way to encourage surgeons to communicate hypothesis, critically assess literature and data, and defend research conclusions to a broad audience. The goal of this study was to define surgery resident publishing epidemiology and identify characteristics of residents and residency programs that might predict increased publication productivity. Materials and methods A survey was administered to eight general surgery residency programs to collect residency and resident variables from 1993-2013. The primary endpoint was the number of first-author publications produced per resident. Secondary endpoints included clinical setting at which the former resident was practicing, fellowship pursued, and manuscript quality. Results Between 1993 and 2013, 676 residents graduated, median age was 33 years (range: 29-43 years) and 182 (27{\%}) were female. Three hundred and sixty-six (54{\%}) residents produced 1229 first-author publications. Of these, 112 (31{\%}) residents produced one manuscript, 125 (34{\%}) produced two-three manuscripts, 107 (29{\%}) produced four-nine manuscripts, and 22 (6{\%}) produced 10 or more manuscripts. Publishing ≥1 manuscript in residency was associated with a 1.5 (P = 0.01) increased odds of having attended a top-tier research institution for medical school and a 2.3 (P < 0.001) increased odds of having dedicated research years incorporated into residency. Surgeons practicing at academic centers had 1.7 (P = 0.003) greater odds of having attended top-tier medical schools, and 1.5 (P = 0.02) greater odds of publishing during residency. Conclusions Additional research directed at identifying interventions promoting resident publishing and scholastic achievement should benefit all surgery training programs looking to cultivate the next generation of critically thinking surgeons.",
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