A Monte Carlo investigation of the spatial resolution performance of a small-animal PET scanner designed for mouse brain imaging studies

Mercedes Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Yongfeng Yang, Simon R Cherry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our laboratory has developed PET detectors with depth-encoding accuracy of ~2mm based on finely pixelated crystals with a tapered geometry, readout at both ends with position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). These detectors are currently being used in our laboratory to build a one-ring high resolution PET scanner for mouse brain imaging studies. Due to the inactive areas around the PSAPDs, large gaps exist between the detector modules which can degrade the image spatial resolution obtained using analytical reconstruction with filtered backprojection (FBP). In this work, the Geant4-based GATE Monte Carlo package was used to assist in determining whether gantry rotation was necessary and to assess the expected spatial resolution of the system. The following factors were investigated: rotating vs. static gantry modes with and without compensation of missing data using the discrete cosine transform (DCT) method, two levels of depth-encoding, and positron annihilation effects for 18F. Our results indicate that while the static scanner produces poor quality FBP images with streak and ring artifacts, the image quality was greatly improved after compensation of missing data. The simulation indicates that the expected FWHM system spatial resolution is 0.70±0.05mm, which approaches the predicted limit of 0.5mm FWHM due to positron range, photon non-colinearity and physical detector element size effects. We conclude that excellent reconstructed resolution without gantry rotation is possible even using FBP if the gaps are appropriately handled and that this design can approach the resolution limits set by positron annihilation physics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-85
Number of pages10
JournalPhysica Medica
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Avalanches
Neuroimaging
gantry cranes
scanners
brain
mice
animals
spatial resolution
Electrons
detectors
positron annihilation
avalanches
photodiodes
coding
Physics
GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment
Photons
Artifacts
discrete cosine transform
rings

Keywords

  • Discrete cosine transform
  • High-resolution imaging
  • Monte Carlo
  • Small-animal PET

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

A Monte Carlo investigation of the spatial resolution performance of a small-animal PET scanner designed for mouse brain imaging studies. / Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Yang, Yongfeng; Cherry, Simon R.

In: Physica Medica, Vol. 30, No. 1, 02.2014, p. 76-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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