A microeconomic evaluation of the impact of Mycoplasma meleagridis infection in turkey production

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Abstract

A microeconomic evaluation approach was used to determine the economic impact of Mycoplasma meleagridis (MM) infection in turkeys. Profit maximization, using the production, cost and profit functions, and prices of inputs and outputs was utilized to determine the economically optimal time birds should be raised as well as the corresponding optimal level of feed input and liveweight meat output. Optimal was defined as that level which maximized profits. Using regression analysis, the predicted weights of MM-infected (MM(+)) males and females were found to be significantly greater, for a given age or level of feed input, than noninfected (MM(-)) cohorts of identical age and parent line. This unusual weight advantage demonstrated by the infected birds may be the result of higher embryo mortality of this group thus reducing the survivability of some of the potentially poor weight gainers in the MM(+) group. By evaluating the profit functions, this weight advantage also translated into a profit advantage of $0.06 per bird associated with raising MM(+) turkeys. Although the weight gain results were obtained from birds raised under environmentally controlled conditions and thus not subjected to typical overcrowding and climatic stress faced under field conditions, they agree with recent results obtained in a field study (Carpenter et al., 1982a). This apparent profit advantage should be considered when measuring the benefits derived from averting decreased hatchability, leg problems, and other anomalies associated with MM infection. This microeconomic approach should aid producers, veterinarians and administrators in their disease control/eradication decision making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-301
Number of pages13
JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

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Mycoplasma meleagridis
microeconomics
Mycoplasma Infections
poultry production
profits and margins
Birds
infection
Weights and Measures
birds
profit maximization
input prices
Disease Eradication
Veterinarians
embryonic mortality
economic impact
Administrative Personnel
production costs
Meat
Weight Gain
veterinarians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Animals
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

A microeconomic evaluation of the impact of Mycoplasma meleagridis infection in turkey production. / Carpenter, Tim.

In: Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Vol. 1, No. 4, 01.01.1983, p. 289-301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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