A longitudinal follow-up study of young children's sleep patterns using a developmental classification system.

Erika E. Gaylor, Melissa M. Burnham, Beth L. Goodlin-Jones, Thomas F. Anders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Sixty-eight families participated in a longitudinal study that included video observations of sleep during the 1st year of life and annual follow-up phone interviews until the children were 4 years of age. Results revealed that approximately 19% of children have a sleep problem at 2 years of age, defined either by research criteria or parental report, and that sleep problems diminished over time. Approximately 25% of children were reported to be cosleeping at each follow-up interview, but only a third of the parents reported this behavior to be problematic. A subgroup of infants (33%), who were considered stable, non-self-soothers in the 1st year, were more likely to have a sleep onset problem and be cosleeping at the 2-year follow-up assessment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-61
Number of pages18
JournalBehavioral Sleep Medicine
Volume3
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

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    Gaylor, E. E., Burnham, M. M., Goodlin-Jones, B. L., & Anders, T. F. (2005). A longitudinal follow-up study of young children's sleep patterns using a developmental classification system. Behavioral Sleep Medicine, 3(1), 44-61.