A lack of Living donor renal transplantation for Asian children represents an opportunity to improve pediatric healthcare

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The relationship between pediatric primary care practitioners and families provides an early opportunity to address ethnic/racial pediatric subspecialty health care disparities. Living donor pediatric renal transplantation is safe and more effective than deceased donor renal transplantation. The purpose of this study is to identify groups of children who may be less likely to receive living donor renal transplantation, as the first step in assisting pediatric clinicians to increase living donor renal transplantation. Method: We employed a retrospective cohort design. We analyzed data from the medical records of 80 children receiving renal transplantation over 20 years in a large pediatric medical center. Resulte The proportions of children receiving a living donor renal allograft differed by ethnicity/race (P =.04). Specifically, children of Asian ethnicity/race were significantly less likely than children of White ethnicity/race to receive a living donor renal allograft (P =.01). There were no significant differences in age at transplantation or wait time for deceased donor transplantation. Discussion: We discuss the possible reasons for the discrepancy and potential directions for family-centered pediatric practice, policy, and research to address this potential pediatric healthcare disparity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)196-200
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume105
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 2013

Fingerprint

Living Donors
Kidney Transplantation
Pediatrics
Delivery of Health Care
Healthcare Disparities
Allografts
Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Kidney
Medical Records
Primary Health Care
Research

Keywords

  • Ethnicity/race
  • Healthcare disparity
  • Renal transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "A lack of Living donor renal transplantation for Asian children represents an opportunity to improve pediatric healthcare",
abstract = "Introduction: The relationship between pediatric primary care practitioners and families provides an early opportunity to address ethnic/racial pediatric subspecialty health care disparities. Living donor pediatric renal transplantation is safe and more effective than deceased donor renal transplantation. The purpose of this study is to identify groups of children who may be less likely to receive living donor renal transplantation, as the first step in assisting pediatric clinicians to increase living donor renal transplantation. Method: We employed a retrospective cohort design. We analyzed data from the medical records of 80 children receiving renal transplantation over 20 years in a large pediatric medical center. Resulte The proportions of children receiving a living donor renal allograft differed by ethnicity/race (P =.04). Specifically, children of Asian ethnicity/race were significantly less likely than children of White ethnicity/race to receive a living donor renal allograft (P =.01). There were no significant differences in age at transplantation or wait time for deceased donor transplantation. Discussion: We discuss the possible reasons for the discrepancy and potential directions for family-centered pediatric practice, policy, and research to address this potential pediatric healthcare disparity.",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - A lack of Living donor renal transplantation for Asian children represents an opportunity to improve pediatric healthcare

AU - Fernandez y Garcia, Erik

AU - Lau, Keith K.

PY - 2013/6

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N2 - Introduction: The relationship between pediatric primary care practitioners and families provides an early opportunity to address ethnic/racial pediatric subspecialty health care disparities. Living donor pediatric renal transplantation is safe and more effective than deceased donor renal transplantation. The purpose of this study is to identify groups of children who may be less likely to receive living donor renal transplantation, as the first step in assisting pediatric clinicians to increase living donor renal transplantation. Method: We employed a retrospective cohort design. We analyzed data from the medical records of 80 children receiving renal transplantation over 20 years in a large pediatric medical center. Resulte The proportions of children receiving a living donor renal allograft differed by ethnicity/race (P =.04). Specifically, children of Asian ethnicity/race were significantly less likely than children of White ethnicity/race to receive a living donor renal allograft (P =.01). There were no significant differences in age at transplantation or wait time for deceased donor transplantation. Discussion: We discuss the possible reasons for the discrepancy and potential directions for family-centered pediatric practice, policy, and research to address this potential pediatric healthcare disparity.

AB - Introduction: The relationship between pediatric primary care practitioners and families provides an early opportunity to address ethnic/racial pediatric subspecialty health care disparities. Living donor pediatric renal transplantation is safe and more effective than deceased donor renal transplantation. The purpose of this study is to identify groups of children who may be less likely to receive living donor renal transplantation, as the first step in assisting pediatric clinicians to increase living donor renal transplantation. Method: We employed a retrospective cohort design. We analyzed data from the medical records of 80 children receiving renal transplantation over 20 years in a large pediatric medical center. Resulte The proportions of children receiving a living donor renal allograft differed by ethnicity/race (P =.04). Specifically, children of Asian ethnicity/race were significantly less likely than children of White ethnicity/race to receive a living donor renal allograft (P =.01). There were no significant differences in age at transplantation or wait time for deceased donor transplantation. Discussion: We discuss the possible reasons for the discrepancy and potential directions for family-centered pediatric practice, policy, and research to address this potential pediatric healthcare disparity.

KW - Ethnicity/race

KW - Healthcare disparity

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