A hypertension risk score for middle-aged and older adults

Abhijit V. Kshirsagar, Ya lin Chiu, Andrew S. Bomback, Phyllis A. August, Anthony J. Viera, Romulo E. Colindres, Heejung Bang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Determining which demographic and medical variables predict the development of hypertension could help clinicians stratify risk in both prehypertensive and nonhypertensive persons. Subject-level data from 2 community-based biracial cohorts were combined to ascertain the relationship between baseline characteristics and incident hypertension. Hypertension, defined as diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg, systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg, or reported use of medication known to treat hypertension, was assessed prospectively at 3, 6, and 9 years. Internal validation was performed by the split-sample method with a 2:1 ratio for training and testing samples, respectively. A scoring algorithm was developed by converting the multivariable regression coefficients to integer values. Age, level of systolic or diastolic blood pressure, smoking, family history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, high body mass index, female sex, and lack of exercise were associated with the development of hypertension in the training sample. Regression models showed moderate to high capabilities of discrimination between hypertension vs nonhypertension (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.75-0.78) in the testing sample at 3, 6, and 9 years of follow-up. This risk calculator may aide health care providers in guiding discussions with patients about the risk for progression to hypertension. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2010;12:800-808.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)800-808
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Hypertension
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Hypertension
Blood Pressure
ROC Curve
Health Personnel
Diabetes Mellitus
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Demography
Exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Kshirsagar, A. V., Chiu, Y. L., Bomback, A. S., August, P. A., Viera, A. J., Colindres, R. E., & Bang, H. (2010). A hypertension risk score for middle-aged and older adults. Journal of Clinical Hypertension, 12(10), 800-808. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-7176.2010.00343.x

A hypertension risk score for middle-aged and older adults. / Kshirsagar, Abhijit V.; Chiu, Ya lin; Bomback, Andrew S.; August, Phyllis A.; Viera, Anthony J.; Colindres, Romulo E.; Bang, Heejung.

In: Journal of Clinical Hypertension, Vol. 12, No. 10, 10.2010, p. 800-808.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kshirsagar, AV, Chiu, YL, Bomback, AS, August, PA, Viera, AJ, Colindres, RE & Bang, H 2010, 'A hypertension risk score for middle-aged and older adults', Journal of Clinical Hypertension, vol. 12, no. 10, pp. 800-808. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-7176.2010.00343.x
Kshirsagar AV, Chiu YL, Bomback AS, August PA, Viera AJ, Colindres RE et al. A hypertension risk score for middle-aged and older adults. Journal of Clinical Hypertension. 2010 Oct;12(10):800-808. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-7176.2010.00343.x
Kshirsagar, Abhijit V. ; Chiu, Ya lin ; Bomback, Andrew S. ; August, Phyllis A. ; Viera, Anthony J. ; Colindres, Romulo E. ; Bang, Heejung. / A hypertension risk score for middle-aged and older adults. In: Journal of Clinical Hypertension. 2010 ; Vol. 12, No. 10. pp. 800-808.
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