A high-fat diet containing whole walnuts (Juglans regia) reduces tumour size and growth along with plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate model

Paul A. Davis, Vihas T. Vasu, Kishorchandra Gohil, Hyunsook Kim, Imran Khan, Carroll E Cross, Wallace Yokoyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prostate cancer (PCa) has been linked to fat intake, but the effects of both different dietary fat levels and types remain inconsistent and incompletely characterised. The effects on PCa in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) cancer model of an elevated fat (20% of energy as fat) diet containing 155g of whole walnuts were compared to those of an elevated fat (20% of energy as soyabean oil) diet with matched macronutrients, tocopherols as well as a low-fat (8% of energy as soyabean oil) diet. Mice, starting at 8 weeks of age, consumed one of the three different diets ad libitum; and prostates, livers and blood were obtained after 9, 18 or 24 weeks of feeding. No differences were observed in whole animal growth rates in either high-fat (HF) diet group, but prostate tumour weight and growth rate were reduced in the walnut diet group. Walnut diet group prostate weight, plasma insulin-like growth factor 1, resistin and LDL were lower at 18 weeks, while no statistically significant prostate weight differences by diet were seen at 9 or 24 weeks. Multiple metabolites in the livers differed by diet at 9 and 18 weeks. The walnut diet's beneficial effects probably represent the effects of whole walnuts' multiple constituents and not via a specific fatty acid or tocopherols. Moreover, as the two HF diets had dissimilar effects on prostate tumour growth rate and size, and yet had the same total fat and tocopherol composition and content, this suggests that these are not strongly linked to PCa growth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1764-1772
Number of pages9
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume108
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2012

Fingerprint

Juglans
High Fat Diet
Somatomedins
Transgenic Mice
Prostate
Adenocarcinoma
Diet
Growth
Fats
Neoplasms
Tocopherols
Prostatic Neoplasms
Oils
Resistin
Weights and Measures
Dietary Fats
Liver
Tumor Burden
LDL Lipoproteins
Fatty Acids

Keywords

  • Chemoprevention
  • Fat
  • Insulin-like growth factor 1
  • Prostate cancer
  • Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate model
  • Whole foods

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

A high-fat diet containing whole walnuts (Juglans regia) reduces tumour size and growth along with plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate model. / Davis, Paul A.; Vasu, Vihas T.; Gohil, Kishorchandra; Kim, Hyunsook; Khan, Imran; Cross, Carroll E; Yokoyama, Wallace.

In: British Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 108, No. 10, 28.11.2012, p. 1764-1772.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Prostate cancer (PCa) has been linked to fat intake, but the effects of both different dietary fat levels and types remain inconsistent and incompletely characterised. The effects on PCa in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) cancer model of an elevated fat (20{\%} of energy as fat) diet containing 155g of whole walnuts were compared to those of an elevated fat (20{\%} of energy as soyabean oil) diet with matched macronutrients, tocopherols as well as a low-fat (8{\%} of energy as soyabean oil) diet. Mice, starting at 8 weeks of age, consumed one of the three different diets ad libitum; and prostates, livers and blood were obtained after 9, 18 or 24 weeks of feeding. No differences were observed in whole animal growth rates in either high-fat (HF) diet group, but prostate tumour weight and growth rate were reduced in the walnut diet group. Walnut diet group prostate weight, plasma insulin-like growth factor 1, resistin and LDL were lower at 18 weeks, while no statistically significant prostate weight differences by diet were seen at 9 or 24 weeks. Multiple metabolites in the livers differed by diet at 9 and 18 weeks. The walnut diet's beneficial effects probably represent the effects of whole walnuts' multiple constituents and not via a specific fatty acid or tocopherols. Moreover, as the two HF diets had dissimilar effects on prostate tumour growth rate and size, and yet had the same total fat and tocopherol composition and content, this suggests that these are not strongly linked to PCa growth.",
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