A dose-response effect from chocolate consumption on plasma epicatechin and oxidative damage

Janice F. Wang, Derek D. Schramm, Roberta R. Holt, Jodi L. Ensunsa, Cesar G. Fraga, Harold H. Schmitz, Carl L Keen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that a diet high in plant foods and rich in polyphenols is inversely associated with a risk for cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. Chocolate, like red wine and green tea, is a polyphenol-rich food, primarily containing procyanidin polyphenols. These polyphenols are hypothesized to provide cardioprotective effects due to their ability to scavenge free radicals and inhibit lipid oxidation. Herein, we demonstrate that 2 h after the ingestion of a procyanidin-rich chocolate containing 5.3 mg total procyanidin/g, of which 1.3 mg/g was (-)-epicatechin (epicatechin), plasma levels of epicatechin increased 133 ± 27,258 ± 29 and 355 ± 49 nmol/L in individuals who consumed 27, 53 and 80 g of chocolate, respectively. That the rise in plasma epicatechin levels was functionally significant is suggested by observations of trends for dose-response increases in the plasma antioxidant capacity and decreases in plasma lipid oxidation products. The above data support the theories that in healthy adults, 1) a positive relationship exists between procyanidin consumption and plasma procyanidin concentration and 2) the rise in plasma epicatechin contributes to the ability of plasma to scavenge free radicals and to inhibit lipid peroxidation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume130
Issue number8 SUPPL.
StatePublished - 2000

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Catechin
chocolate
epicatechin
dose response
polyphenols
Polyphenols
lipid peroxidation
cardioprotective effect
Free Radicals
green tea
red wines
food plants
chronic diseases
blood lipids
Lipids
epidemiological studies
Edible Plants
Tea
Wine
Chocolate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Wang, J. F., Schramm, D. D., Holt, R. R., Ensunsa, J. L., Fraga, C. G., Schmitz, H. H., & Keen, C. L. (2000). A dose-response effect from chocolate consumption on plasma epicatechin and oxidative damage. Journal of Nutrition, 130(8 SUPPL.).

A dose-response effect from chocolate consumption on plasma epicatechin and oxidative damage. / Wang, Janice F.; Schramm, Derek D.; Holt, Roberta R.; Ensunsa, Jodi L.; Fraga, Cesar G.; Schmitz, Harold H.; Keen, Carl L.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 130, No. 8 SUPPL., 2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, JF, Schramm, DD, Holt, RR, Ensunsa, JL, Fraga, CG, Schmitz, HH & Keen, CL 2000, 'A dose-response effect from chocolate consumption on plasma epicatechin and oxidative damage', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 130, no. 8 SUPPL..
Wang JF, Schramm DD, Holt RR, Ensunsa JL, Fraga CG, Schmitz HH et al. A dose-response effect from chocolate consumption on plasma epicatechin and oxidative damage. Journal of Nutrition. 2000;130(8 SUPPL.).
Wang, Janice F. ; Schramm, Derek D. ; Holt, Roberta R. ; Ensunsa, Jodi L. ; Fraga, Cesar G. ; Schmitz, Harold H. ; Keen, Carl L. / A dose-response effect from chocolate consumption on plasma epicatechin and oxidative damage. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2000 ; Vol. 130, No. 8 SUPPL.
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