A cross-sectional study of provider and patient characteristics associated with outpatient disclosures of dietary supplement use

Derjung M. Tarn, Arun Karlamangla, Ian D. Coulter, Debora A Paterniti, Lyndee Knox, Peter S. Khang, Ka Kit Hui, Neil S. Wenger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Explore patterns in patients' disclosures of supplement use and identify provider and patient characteristics associated with disclosures. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 61 outpatient primary care, integrative medicine, and complementary medicine providers, and 603 of their patients. Primary outcomes were supplement disclosures (based on audio recorded office visits, post-visit patient surveys and medical record abstractions for the day of the visits). Results: Seventy-nine percent of 603 patients reported on a post-visit survey that they took a total of 2107 dietary supplements. Of those taking supplements, 232 patients (48.6%) discussed at least one supplement with their provider on the day of their office visit. However, patients disclosed only 714 (33.9%) of the 2107 supplements they were taking. Patients more frequently disclosed supplement use when they saw providers who attributed greater importance to asking about supplements. Patient characteristics such as patient activation, number of medical conditions, and use of prescription medications were not associated with disclosure of supplement use. Conclusions: Provider rating of the importance of asking about supplements is a major factor prompting patients' disclosures of supplement use. Practice implications: Provider-targeted interventions to encourage provider awareness about potential supplement-drug interactions are needed to increase disclosures about dietary supplement use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)830-836
Number of pages7
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume98
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

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Disclosure
Dietary Supplements
Outpatients
Cross-Sectional Studies
Office Visits
Integrative Medicine
Patient Participation
Ambulatory Care
Complementary Therapies
Drug Interactions
Medical Records
Prescriptions
Primary Health Care

Keywords

  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Dietary supplements
  • Provider-patient communication
  • Provider-patient relations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A cross-sectional study of provider and patient characteristics associated with outpatient disclosures of dietary supplement use. / Tarn, Derjung M.; Karlamangla, Arun; Coulter, Ian D.; Paterniti, Debora A; Knox, Lyndee; Khang, Peter S.; Hui, Ka Kit; Wenger, Neil S.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 98, No. 7, 01.07.2015, p. 830-836.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tarn, Derjung M. ; Karlamangla, Arun ; Coulter, Ian D. ; Paterniti, Debora A ; Knox, Lyndee ; Khang, Peter S. ; Hui, Ka Kit ; Wenger, Neil S. / A cross-sectional study of provider and patient characteristics associated with outpatient disclosures of dietary supplement use. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2015 ; Vol. 98, No. 7. pp. 830-836.
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