A convergent-divergent approach to context processing, general intellectual functioning, and the genetic liability to schizophrenia

Angus W. MacDonald, Vina M. Goghari, Brian M. Hicks, Cameron S Carter, Janine D. Flory, Stephen B. Manuck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Convergent and divergent validity are critically important in developing psychological measures that reveal interpretable deficits in disordered populations. This article reports on 2 studies that evaluated the validity of context processing measures. In Experiment I. a confirmatory factor analysis of data from 481 healthy adults established the convergent validity of 2 context processing measures and showed that context processing accounted for significant amounts of variance in standard IQ and working memory measures. In Experiment 2, 20 schizophrenia patients, 16 of their healthy siblings, and 28 controls were evaluated using a novel, short context processing measure, the dot pattern expectancy (DPX) task. The DPX was sensitive to specific deficits in schizophrenia patients and their healthy siblings. These findings support the construct validity of context processing measures, suggest context processing is a component of intellectual functioning, and demonstrate that brief context processing measures remain sensitive to psychopathological deficits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)814-821
Number of pages8
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

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Short-Term Memory
Statistical Factor Analysis
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Keywords

  • Context processing
  • Edophenotype
  • Itelligence
  • Shizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

A convergent-divergent approach to context processing, general intellectual functioning, and the genetic liability to schizophrenia. / MacDonald, Angus W.; Goghari, Vina M.; Hicks, Brian M.; Carter, Cameron S; Flory, Janine D.; Manuck, Stephen B.

In: Neuropsychology, Vol. 19, No. 6, 11.2005, p. 814-821.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

MacDonald, Angus W. ; Goghari, Vina M. ; Hicks, Brian M. ; Carter, Cameron S ; Flory, Janine D. ; Manuck, Stephen B. / A convergent-divergent approach to context processing, general intellectual functioning, and the genetic liability to schizophrenia. In: Neuropsychology. 2005 ; Vol. 19, No. 6. pp. 814-821.
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