A comparison of races and leukemia subtypes among patients in different cancer survivorship phases

Devesh M. Pandya, Sukeshi Patel, Norma S. Ketchum, Bradley H Pollock, Swaminathan Padmanabhan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The three phases of cancer survivorship include the acute survival phase (ASP), the extended survival phase (ESP), and the permanent survival phase (PSP). This Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective pilot project compared races and leukemia subtypes among patients in the ASP, ESP, and PSP. Methods: Fifty-five adult patients from our National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center were individually interviewed. Subjects were asked about multiple areas of survivorship including their social support system, distress level, and quality of life. Results: Demographics of the 55 patients are acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), 10; acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), 9; chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 23; and chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML), 13. There were 23 females and 32 males, 30 Hispanics, 20 Caucasians, and 5 African-Americans. Twenty-two patients were in the ASP, 21 in the ESP, and 12 in the PSP. AML patients experienced the most physical, family, emotional, and spiritual problems (78%, 33%, 56%, and 22%, respectively). AML patients also had the highest distress level with a mean score of 5.8 (SD 1.7), compared to ALL (1.8), CLL (3.2), and CML (5.1) (P value <.001). Among all the phases of survivorship, the ASP had the highest distress level (mean, 4.8) and the worst quality of life (mean, 2.3). The ASP patients had the most treatment for depression (38%). When comparing races, African Americans and Hispanics (40% and 37%, respectively) were unable to cope with finances, compared to Caucasians (5%), (P value.016). Fear of recurrence was higher in Hispanics (67%), compared to African Americans (40%) and Caucasians (30%) (P value.031). Hispanics (40%) experienced more problems with housing, insurance, and work, as compared to African Americans (20%) and Caucasians (10%) (P value.047). Conclusion: This study addresses the perceptions and beliefs of leukemia survivors and found that AML and minority patients need further investigation on various aspects of quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Lymphoma, Myeloma and Leukemia
Volume11
Issue numberSUPPL.1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Leukemia
Survival Rate
Survival
Neoplasms
Hispanic Americans
Acute Myeloid Leukemia
African Americans
Quality of Life
B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Research Ethics Committees
Insurance
Social Support
Fear
Survivors
Demography
Depression
Recurrence

Keywords

  • Acute myelogenous leukemia
  • Acute survival phase
  • Chronic myelogenous leukemia
  • Extended survival phase
  • Permanent survival phase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

A comparison of races and leukemia subtypes among patients in different cancer survivorship phases. / Pandya, Devesh M.; Patel, Sukeshi; Ketchum, Norma S.; Pollock, Bradley H; Padmanabhan, Swaminathan.

In: Clinical Lymphoma, Myeloma and Leukemia, Vol. 11, No. SUPPL.1, 06.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pandya, Devesh M. ; Patel, Sukeshi ; Ketchum, Norma S. ; Pollock, Bradley H ; Padmanabhan, Swaminathan. / A comparison of races and leukemia subtypes among patients in different cancer survivorship phases. In: Clinical Lymphoma, Myeloma and Leukemia. 2011 ; Vol. 11, No. SUPPL.1.
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AU - Padmanabhan, Swaminathan

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N2 - Background: The three phases of cancer survivorship include the acute survival phase (ASP), the extended survival phase (ESP), and the permanent survival phase (PSP). This Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective pilot project compared races and leukemia subtypes among patients in the ASP, ESP, and PSP. Methods: Fifty-five adult patients from our National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center were individually interviewed. Subjects were asked about multiple areas of survivorship including their social support system, distress level, and quality of life. Results: Demographics of the 55 patients are acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), 10; acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), 9; chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 23; and chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML), 13. There were 23 females and 32 males, 30 Hispanics, 20 Caucasians, and 5 African-Americans. Twenty-two patients were in the ASP, 21 in the ESP, and 12 in the PSP. AML patients experienced the most physical, family, emotional, and spiritual problems (78%, 33%, 56%, and 22%, respectively). AML patients also had the highest distress level with a mean score of 5.8 (SD 1.7), compared to ALL (1.8), CLL (3.2), and CML (5.1) (P value <.001). Among all the phases of survivorship, the ASP had the highest distress level (mean, 4.8) and the worst quality of life (mean, 2.3). The ASP patients had the most treatment for depression (38%). When comparing races, African Americans and Hispanics (40% and 37%, respectively) were unable to cope with finances, compared to Caucasians (5%), (P value.016). Fear of recurrence was higher in Hispanics (67%), compared to African Americans (40%) and Caucasians (30%) (P value.031). Hispanics (40%) experienced more problems with housing, insurance, and work, as compared to African Americans (20%) and Caucasians (10%) (P value.047). Conclusion: This study addresses the perceptions and beliefs of leukemia survivors and found that AML and minority patients need further investigation on various aspects of quality of life.

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KW - Chronic myelogenous leukemia

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