A comparison of key essential nutrients in commercial plant-based pet foods sold in canada to american and european canine and feline dietary recommendations

Sarah A.S. Dodd, Anna K. Shoveller, Andrea J. Fascetti, Zengshou Z. Yu, David W.L. Ma, Adronie Verbrugghe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Plant-based foods intended for feeding dogs and cats are available in Canada, though few studies have examined the suitability of plant-based foods for dogs and cats. All commercial plant-based extruded and wet pet food products available in Ontario, Canada, in 2018 (n = 26) were acquired and analysed for energy, crude protein, crude fat, crude fibre, ash, amino acids, fatty acids, minerals and vitamins A, B12, D2 and D3. Results were compared with recommendations of the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) and the European Pet Food Industry Federation (FEDIAF). Thirteen products were labelled for adult canine maintenance, four for canine all life stages, one for puppy growth, two for adult feline maintenance, three for feline all life stages, one for adult maintenance of dogs and cats and two for all life stages of dogs and cats. Four products met AAFCO and one product met FEDIAF nutrient recommendations for canine maintenance. No diets met AAFCO or FEDIAF recommendations for feline maintenance or growth for either species. Nutrients most commonly found insufficient were: sulfur amino acids, taurine, arachidonic acid, EPA and DHA, calcium phosphorus and vitamin D. There were no nutrients unable to be provided from non-animal sources. Compliance with labelling guidelines was also poor, similar to other findings with commercial animal-based pet products. The results from this study indicate areas where producers of plant-based pet foods must improve to meet the industry recommended nutrient profiles and labelling requirements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2348
JournalAnimals
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Balanced diet
  • Canine nutrition
  • Cat food
  • Dog food
  • Feline nutrition
  • Nutritional adequacy
  • Vegan
  • Vegetarian

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

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