A comparison of immediate versus delayed endoscopic injection sclerosis of bleeding esophageal varices

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Abstract

The authors report their experience with immediate endoscopic injection sclerosis at the time of diagnosis of active bleeding esophageal varices compared to delayed sclerotherapy performed after control of variceal bleeding with vasopressin and Sengstaken-Blakemore tamponade. Twenty-eight active index bleeders and 20 active rebleeders were treated by immediate endoscopic injection sclerosis, which could technically be performed on all of the former and in 18 of the rebleeders (96%). Immediate control of active bleeding was achieved in all patients whose varices were injected (100%). Control at 48 hours was 89% for the index bleeding group and 80% for the rebleeding group. In the delayed sclerotherapy group of 19 patients, initial control (79%) and 48-hour control (64%) were significantly less. The rebleeding rate, complications, and death from exsanguination were greater in the delayed group, whereas longevity was similar in both groups. We conclude that immediate sclerotherapy effectively controls acutely bleeding esophageal varices with a lower complication rate than sclerotherapy performed after conventional medical therapy with vasopressin and Sengstaken-Blakemore tube tamponade.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-388
Number of pages4
JournalGastrointestinal Endoscopy
Volume32
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1986

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Esophageal and Gastric Varices
Sclerosis
Sclerotherapy
Hemorrhage
Injections
Vasopressins
Exsanguination
Varicose Veins
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

A comparison of immediate versus delayed endoscopic injection sclerosis of bleeding esophageal varices. / Prindiville, Thomas P; Trudeau, V.

In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol. 32, No. 6, 1986, p. 385-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The authors report their experience with immediate endoscopic injection sclerosis at the time of diagnosis of active bleeding esophageal varices compared to delayed sclerotherapy performed after control of variceal bleeding with vasopressin and Sengstaken-Blakemore tamponade. Twenty-eight active index bleeders and 20 active rebleeders were treated by immediate endoscopic injection sclerosis, which could technically be performed on all of the former and in 18 of the rebleeders (96{\%}). Immediate control of active bleeding was achieved in all patients whose varices were injected (100{\%}). Control at 48 hours was 89{\%} for the index bleeding group and 80{\%} for the rebleeding group. In the delayed sclerotherapy group of 19 patients, initial control (79{\%}) and 48-hour control (64{\%}) were significantly less. The rebleeding rate, complications, and death from exsanguination were greater in the delayed group, whereas longevity was similar in both groups. We conclude that immediate sclerotherapy effectively controls acutely bleeding esophageal varices with a lower complication rate than sclerotherapy performed after conventional medical therapy with vasopressin and Sengstaken-Blakemore tube tamponade.",
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