A comparison of community-based and hospital-based head and neck cancer screening campaigns: Identifying high-risk individuals and early disease

Michael S. Harris, D. Ryan Phillips, Julia L. Sayer, Michael Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Importance: An enduring challenge in the care of patients with head and neck cancer is identifying disease earlier. Appropriately designed screening campaigns are one proposed strategy. Objective: To determine whether a hospital-based or a community-based head and neck cancer (HNC) screening strategy is more effective in identifying high-risk individuals, signs and symptoms, and findings consistent with head and neck neoplasia. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this retrospective cohort analysis, data from HNC screening efforts held at a tertiary care medical center and at a local motorsports event were compared. Participants completed a questionnaire, and a focused physical examination was performed. Main Outcomes and Measures: Identification rates of high-risk individuals, signs and symptoms, and findings consistent with head and neck neoplasia. Results: The hospital-based and community-based efforts yielded 210 and 1380 individuals screened, respectively. The community-based screening events attracted a significantly greater proportion of participants with risk factors of HNC including male sex (P < .001), current tobacco use ( P < .001), lifetime history of tobacco use (P =.03), smokeless tobacco use (P =.003), and current alcohol use (P =.04). The hospital-based screening events, however, attracted a statistically greater proportion of people reporting prior head and neck or otolaryngologic treatment (P < .001), history of cancer outside the head and neck (P < .001), and a greater median number of symptoms ( P < .001) and examination findings (P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: These data suggest that the 2 screening models attract 2 fundamentally different types of participants, and those in both groups may benefit from screening, albeit for different reasons: one has a higher rate of risk factors, and early-stageHNCmight be discovered while it is more readily treatable; the other has a higher rate of concerning signs, symptoms, and findings, and screening might be used to diagnose or rule out HNC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)568-573
Number of pages6
JournalJAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume139
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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