A comparative study of iron retention in mynahs, doves and rats

Asli Mete, G. M. Dorrestein, J. J M Marx, A. G. Lemmens, A. C. Beynen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Iron retention was studied in rats (Rattus norvegicus), doves (Streptopelia d. decaocto) and two species of mynahs (Acridotheres t. tristis and Gracula r. religiosa) fed two different pelleted diets (88.5 and 567.9 mg Fe/kg diet). The doves and rats served as species that are not susceptible to iron storage, whereas the mynahs are known to develop iron overload frequently. The retention was calculated after measuring the uptake and elimination of a single dose of radioactive iron (59Fe) using whole-body counting. It was hypothesized that the mynahs would retain more iron than the rats and doves, and that after dietary iron challenge the mynahs would downregulate iron retention less effectively. It is concluded that mynahs have much higher iron uptake and retention than doves, but a similar uptake to that in rats. The four studied species are able to downregulate iron retention, the doves being the most efficient. It is suggested that at least part of the susceptibility to iron overload in mynahs is related to a high iron absorption from the intestines regardless of body iron stores, which is comparable with the situation of hereditary haemochromatosis in man.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-486
Number of pages8
JournalAvian Pathology
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Starlings
doves
Columbidae
Iron
iron
rats
iron overload
Iron Overload
Gracula
Down-Regulation
Acridotheres
Whole-Body Counting
hemochromatosis
Dietary Iron
Diet
Streptopelia
iron absorption
Hemochromatosis
Rattus norvegicus
diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Mete, A., Dorrestein, G. M., Marx, J. J. M., Lemmens, A. G., & Beynen, A. C. (2001). A comparative study of iron retention in mynahs, doves and rats. Avian Pathology, 30(5), 479-486. https://doi.org/10.1080/03079450120078671

A comparative study of iron retention in mynahs, doves and rats. / Mete, Asli; Dorrestein, G. M.; Marx, J. J M; Lemmens, A. G.; Beynen, A. C.

In: Avian Pathology, Vol. 30, No. 5, 2001, p. 479-486.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mete, A, Dorrestein, GM, Marx, JJM, Lemmens, AG & Beynen, AC 2001, 'A comparative study of iron retention in mynahs, doves and rats', Avian Pathology, vol. 30, no. 5, pp. 479-486. https://doi.org/10.1080/03079450120078671
Mete, Asli ; Dorrestein, G. M. ; Marx, J. J M ; Lemmens, A. G. ; Beynen, A. C. / A comparative study of iron retention in mynahs, doves and rats. In: Avian Pathology. 2001 ; Vol. 30, No. 5. pp. 479-486.
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