A Bartonella vinsonii berkhoffii typing scheme based upon 16S-23S ITS and Pap31 sequences from dog, coyote, gray fox, and human isolates

Ricardo G. Maggi, Bruno B Chomel, Barbara C. Hegarty, Jennifer Henn, Edward B. Breitschwerdt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

Since the isolation of Bartonella vinsonii subspecies berkhoffii from a dog with endocarditis in 1993, this organism has emerged as an important pathogen in dogs and as an emerging pathogen in people. Current evidence indicates that coyotes, dogs and gray foxes potentially serve as reservoir hosts. Based upon sequence differences within the 16S-23S ITS region and Pap31 gene, we propose a classification scheme that divides B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii isolates into four distinct types. Two conserved sequences, of 37 and 18 bp, respectively, are differentially present within the ITS region of each of the four B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii types. To date, B. vinsonii berkhoffii types I, II, and III have been identified in the US, type III in Europe and type IV in Canada. Based upon the proposed genotyping scheme, the geographic distribution of B. vinsonii berkhoffii types needs to be more thoroughly delineated in future molecular epidemiological studies involving Bartonella infection in coyotes, dogs, gray foxes, human beings and potentially other animals or in arthropod vectors. Strain typing may help to better define the reservoir potential, carriership patterns, modes of transmission, and geographic distribution for each B. vinsonii berkhoffii type.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-134
Number of pages7
JournalMolecular and Cellular Probes
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

Keywords

  • Bacteria
  • Bartonella
  • Canine
  • Classification
  • Genes
  • Pathogen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

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