A 7-month-old who has a persistent rash

Angel Herrera Guerra, Russell J. Osguthorpe, Angelica Putnam, Sheryll L. Vanderhooft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

• PLEVA should be considered in children who present with coexisting papules, ulcers, and eschars. These skin lesions heal, leaving a hypopigmented scar. • Most children who have PLEVA are nontoxic in appearance and are healthy otherwise. • If systemic symptoms are prominent, FUMHD should be considered. • A skin biopsy is mandatory to confirm the diagnosis and exclude more serious conditions, such as malignancy or vasculitis. • Erythromycin is the medication most commonly used as first-line therapy. • Most PLEVA cases are self-limited, although some cases can have a relapsing course before resolving.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics in Review
Volume32
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Exanthema
Skin
Erythromycin
Vasculitis
Ulcer
Cicatrix
Biopsy
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

A 7-month-old who has a persistent rash. / Herrera Guerra, Angel; Osguthorpe, Russell J.; Putnam, Angelica; Vanderhooft, Sheryll L.

In: Pediatrics in Review, Vol. 32, No. 12, 01.12.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Herrera Guerra, Angel ; Osguthorpe, Russell J. ; Putnam, Angelica ; Vanderhooft, Sheryll L. / A 7-month-old who has a persistent rash. In: Pediatrics in Review. 2011 ; Vol. 32, No. 12.
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