PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF RETINAL GANGLION CELLS

  • Ishida, Andrew (PI)

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

The experiments described in this proposal are designed to
investigate the pharmacological and physiological properties of
ganglion cells of adult goldfish retinas. The specific aims of
this project are to identify the types of neurotransmitter
receptors present in ganglion cell membranes, and to analyze the
mechanisms by which these neurotransmitters affect the electrical
activity of ganglion cells. To circumvent the difficulties of
measuring these effects in situ, single ganglion cells will be
dissociated from freshly-dissected retinas by standard methods, and
maintained until use in primary cell culture. The response of
these cells to neurotransmitters and related pharmacologic agents
will then be studied under voltage-clamp to avoid the limitations
of extracellular and intracellular voltage recording. To minimize
cell damage, to control intracellular ionic constituents, and to
directly observe pharmacological effects on single-channel
currents, patch-clamp methods of voltage-clamping will be used. Ganglion cells will be identified by markers transported
retrogradely via the optic nerve or on the basis of morphological
features recognized as unique to ganglion cells in separate
retrograde-filling experiments. Ganglion cells from goldfish will
be used in these studies, because most of the transmitters to be
tested have been localized by histochemical and immunocytochemical
methods to cells which form synaptic inputs onto these cells in
situ -- particularly neuropeptides, acetylcholine, and various
amino acids. This will allow us to formulate models of specific
synaptic interactions in the retina by correlating the results of
the electrophysiological studies described above with anatomical
and histochemical studies of the pre-synaptic inputs to ganglion
cells in the intact retina. These studies should provide
information about the synaptic physiology and pharmacology of
ganglion cells, which in turn may be useful in assessing the
effects of pharmacologic agents on various visual functions, such
as detection of moving stimuli and of concentrically-arranged
stimuli.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date4/1/896/30/18

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $295,250.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $297,000.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $495,348.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $550,565.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $421,437.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $561,801.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $575,347.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $469,211.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $330,345.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $296,750.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $472,562.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $423,879.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $45,308.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $297,000.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $85,585.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $550,565.00

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)

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