OPTICAL AND NEURAL CHANGES IN THE AGING VISUAL SYSTEM

Project: Research project

Description

DESCRIPTION Changes in human vision throughout
the can be attributed are now beginning to be understood. It is known that
the intensity and spectral composition of the retinal stimulus changes over
the life span due to age-related increases in ocular media absorption. The
sensitivities of the cone receptors continuously decline from age 10
through adulthood. These changes in pre-receptoral and receptoral
processing will necessarily alter the input to post-receptoral processes
subserving color appearance. The purpose of this research is to study
post-receptoral processing of chromatic and achromatic information
throughout the life span, with emphasis on the elderly (60-80 years). Test
conditions will be used that allow the separation of pre-receptoral,
receptoral and post-receptoral mechanisms. Color discrimination will be measured under two conditions; one that
depends on variation only in short-wave cone activity and one in which
short-wave cones do not contribute to color discrimination. These data
will indicate whether age-related changes in chromatic discrimination are
due to selective loss in one particular pathway. To determine relative
age-related changes in chromatic and achromatic pathways,
opponent-chromatic response functions, saturation-scaling, and
brightness-matching functions will be measured. These data will not only
document age-correlated changes in individual mechanisms, but will also be
used to test models of the relations between processing at different
levels, particular wavelength discrimination. All of the psychophysical
tests will include observers ranging in age from 10 to 80 years. Complete
psychophysical functions will generally be measured for a group of 10
observers and selected spectral points will be measured for an additional
30-40 observers. Psychophysical testing will also be carried out with
pseudophakic patients having intra-ocular lens implants that either
transmit or absorb ultraviolet radiation to further test the hypothesis
that ultraviolet light exposure contributes to age-correlated changes in
short-wave cone sensitivity, and hence attenuates inputs to post-receptoral
processes. These data may reveal an important environmental contribution
(light itself) to individual differences in aging. Since light exposure
can be partially controlled, the data may have public health significance
for aging populations. This research is thus concerned with separating the
optical and neural mechanisms that mediate age-correlated changes in the
perception and processing of color. These studies may contribute to our
understanding of the factors that contribute to individual variation in
aging of the human visual system.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/29/832/29/16

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $310,900.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $276,210.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $302,232.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $274,350.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $380,233.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $36,789.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $296,512.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $332,061.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $275,900.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $296,512.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $293,547.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $329,856.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $328,150.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $276,210.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $310,575.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $276,210.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $189,683.00
  • National Institutes of Health

Fingerprint

Color
Research
Retina
Radio Waves
Ganglia
Photoreceptor Cells
Color Vision
Macular Degeneration
Diabetic Retinopathy
Light
Crystalline Lens
Contrast Sensitivity
Cataract Extraction
Neuronal Plasticity
Visual Pathways
Individuality
Opsins
Complement Factor H
Light Coagulation
Intraocular Lens Implantation

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)