Nrdp1 Protein Degradation Pathway in Mammary Tumor Progression

Project: Research project

Description

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The aberrant overexpression and concomitant activation of members of the ErbB family of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases plays key roles in promoting the growth and progression of a variety of solid tumor types. The long-term objective of the proposed studies is to understand the role of a novel protein degradation pathway in regulating ErbB-induced tumor progression. A central component of the pathway is a RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase called Nrdp1 that mediates the ubiquitination of ErbB receptors, thereby promoting their trafficking to degradative cellular compartments. The hypothesis guiding these studies is that the Nrdp1 protein degradation pathway regulates ErbB-mediated cellular growth signaling by governing receptor levels through degradation. The two overarching goals for the current funding period are to understand the molecular mechanisms by which Nrdp1 activity is regulated, and to understand the contribution of the Nrdp1 pathway to ErbB receptor-induced mammary tumor growth and progression. These goals will be addressed with three specific aims. 1) The regulation of Nrdp1 stability and activity by growth factors, signaling kinases and deubiquitinating enzymes will be examined using biochemical and molecular biological methods. The interactions among proteins involved in the pathway will also be examined. 2) The impact of the overexpression or loss of Nrdp1 pathway components on the growth properties of cultured mouse and human mammary tumor cell lines will be examined using assays that measure proliferation, survival, motility and invasion. 3) The impact of Nrdp1 on the growth of ErbB-induced mammary tumors in transgenic mouse models will be determined. These studies will assess whether overexpression of wild-type Nrdp1 in the mouse mammary gland can suppress the latency, growth and metastasis of ErbB-induced mammary tumors, and whether overexpression of dominant-negative Nrdp1 can induce mammary tumor formation or potentiate the latency or growth of ErbB-induced tumors. The results of these studies could implicate the Nrdp1 pathway as a suppressor of tumor cell growth and progression, in turn suggesting that restoration or augmentation of pathway function in tumors could offer therapeutic benefit.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date4/1/064/30/17

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $238,880.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $230,387.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $235,778.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $57,925.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $259,771.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $17,793.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $235,778.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $235,778.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $238,880.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $235,520.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $224,547.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $231,713.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $27,170.00

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Proteolysis
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Growth
Human Mammary Glands
Breast
Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
Proteins
Cultured Cells
Epithelial Cells
Transgenic Mice
Growth Factor Receptors
Ubiquitination
Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Carcinogenesis
Transplantation
Tumor Cell Line
Phosphotransferases

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)