Interdisciplinary Training for Autism Researchers (RMI)

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Autism is a complex and lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by a core deficit in social interaction. The disorder includes language impairments, repetitive behaviors and other symptoms, like unusual fears or anxiety. Once considered a rare condition, autism is now known to affect as many as 1 in 250 children. Outcomes are very poor, with only 8-12% of persons successfully achieving independent, fully employed and satisfying lives. The Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (M.I.N.D.) Institute was established in 1998 through a collaboration of Sacramento parents of children with autism and the UC Davis Medical Center. With funding from the State of California, a clinical and research facility has been built and clinical and basic scientists recruited with the explicit goal of understanding the biological bases of autism, in order to develop preventative measures and more effective treatments. As this unique program has developed, it has become increasingly clear that the solution to autism will rely on better communication between clinicians, basic scientists and educators. The proposed training program will develop a cadre of young scientists who will foster this communication in a discipline that might be called Clinical Neurodevelopmental Neuroscience. Trainees will develop expertise in clinically relevant areas of neuroscience, such as human neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuroimaging, at the same time that they are learning the principles and protocols of sensitively conducting research with children. They will develop Core Competencies in areas relevant to autism research that include: epidemiology, genetics-genomics, immunology, animal behavior, human behavior, human development, and neurochemistry-pharmacology. More general training will include course work in research design and analysis and ethical conduct. The training program will enroll six postdoctoral fellows each for a period of two years. The training faculty includes seventeen research scientists. Several of the faculty has daily research conduct with autistic children while other faculty conduct basic research relevant to autism. The trainees will enter this program with backgrounds either in behavioral or biological research, but will interact with primary and secondary mentors to insure the integration of these two disciplinary areas in the conduct of their research.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/29/047/31/19

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $295,678.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $325,595.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $67,623.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $219,574.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $250,479.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $285,762.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $283,133.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $303,021.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $213,613.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $342,831.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $222,132.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $353,885.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $344,214.00

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)

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