COPPER NUTRITION AND DEVELOPMENT

  • Keen, Carl L (PI)

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Copper deprivation results in perinatal death, serious fetal malformations,
and dysynchrony in development, which is related in part to abnormal
maturation of connective tissues and defective oxidative defense
mechanisms. Diabetes during pregnancy also results in a high frequency of
serious fetal malformations in humans and experimental animals. In addition
to abnormal fuel metabolism, diabetes can cause perturbations in copper
(Cu) metabolism, abnormalities in connective tissue maturation and
defective oxidant defense. Consequently, a focus of this proposal is to
examine mechanistically Cu deprivation from a developmental perspective. We
also will contribute information on the extent to which Cu-related events
are important to selected pathologies that are observed in diabetes. There
are four specific aims. Specific aim one is to determine how maternal Cu deprivation alters
embryonic and/or fetal uptake/retention of Cu. Specific aim two is to
relate changes in maternal and fetal hepatic uptake and distribution of Cu
with changes in diet and/or endocrine status. Specific aim three is to
establish developmental priorities in Cu utilization for superoxide
dismutase, lysyl oxidase and ceruloplasmin. Specific aim four is to
characterize how diet and the diabetic state alters extracellular matrix
deposition in heart and major vessels in the fetus, neonate and adult. The
work involves well established animal models, immunological and molecular
biological techniques. If in the above studies it is shown that diabetes has long lasting effects
on Cu metabolism and the development of the offspring, this will suggest
the need for new approaches in the management of pregnant diabetic women
and their offspring. In addition, the results from these studies will have
broad applications in developmental biology related to the teratogenicity
of an important essential nutrient, i.e., copper.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date6/1/906/30/06

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $247,253.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $247,253.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $247,253.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $246,420.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $243,090.00
  • National Institutes of Health

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Explore the research topics touched on by this project. These labels are generated based on the underlying awards/grants. Together they form a unique fingerprint.