CD4 T Cell Response to Salmonella

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The recognition of microbes by the innate and adaptive immune system can lead to the resolution of infection and development of long-lived immunity. Many microbial pathogens gain entry to the host by penetrating mucosal surfaces of the lung, intestine and genito-urinary tract. However, the induction of immune responses to microbial pathogens at mucosal surfaces is not well understood. The specific aims of the proposal are: Aim 1. To identify the cell types that present Salmonella antigens in vivo in order to test the hypothesis that lymphoid dendritic cells activate Salmonella-specific CD4 T cells. These studies will directly examine the presentation of a Salmonella encoded antigen in vivo, in order to test the hypothesis that lymphoid dendritic cells are responsible for activating Salmonella-specific CD4 T cells after oral infection. Aim 2. To examine Salmonella-specific T cell activation in the spleen and define mechanisms that account for T cell unresponsiveness in this organ. Our preliminary data indicate that Salmonella-specific CD4 T cells are inefficiently activated in the spleen, despite bacterial replication in this organ. We hypothesize that the location of bacteria in the spleen red pulp physically separates antigen from Salmonella-specific T cells. This will be tested using a novel Salmonella-specific TCR adoptive transfer system. Aim 3. To examine CD4T cell differentiation and migration in order to test the idea that effector/memory T cells are not efficiently generated after Salmonella infection. Our preliminary data indicate a defect in non-lymphoid migration of Salmonella-specific T cells following oral infection. We hypothesize that T cell effector functions do not develop efficiently, due to the local mucosal priming environment. This issue will be tested by examining the effector cytokine production and non-lymphoid migration of Salmonella-specific T cell after oral infection. These studies will provide new insight into the development of immunity to mucosal pathogens.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date7/1/032/28/15

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $371,844.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $328,471.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $354,699.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $367,957.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $95,918.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $369,988.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $185,461.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $146,520.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $326,250.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $320,414.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $326,620.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $269,750.00

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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